Whirlwind Trip to Colorado, Hillsdale National Leadership Seminar

Last week, RB49 and Hubby flew to Denver for a Hillsdale College National Leadership Seminar.  I usually have an aisle seat on an airplane, but this time I had the window seat, and I saw some beautiful scenery below.

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We picked up the rental SUV, and drove south to the city of Colorado Springs, where we found the Broadmoor Resort, a very old, and very beautiful, hotel at the foot of the Rocky Mountains.  We barely had time to get settled in our beautiful room, before it was time to attend the President’s Club reception.  Here’s the view from our room.

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At the reception, we met up with some people we already knew from Ricochet, one couple who live in Colorado Springs, and a woman from Texas (yes, Hillsdale has supporters all over this country).  We went in to dinner, and had a very nice meal.  Tuesday’s dinner was Frank Luntz, a well-known pollster, who told us that he became a conservative gradually, while learning about what motivates the people he polled over the years.  His theme was “how to speak about conservatism”, and he emphasized some of the points I have been saying over the years (you can’t convert liberals by arguing with them-you need to appeal to their emotions).  Here’s one of the many slides he showed about better terms to use in your conversations.

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After that dinner, Hubby and I went on a little walking tour of the building.  The Broadmoor has dozens of original paintings and sculptures by Western artists, accumulated over the more than 100-year history of the property.

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In a dimly-lighted lounge, I spotted this cleverly-designed footstool.  Very cute!

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Can you tell that he’s a turtle?

We fell into bed, exhausted from our busy day.  The room was sumptuous by our standards, and very comfortable and quiet, even though it was just across the hall from the elevator.

The next day, after continental breakfast, there were more speakers, including Sharyl Atkisson, a rather famous journalist (whose computer was compromised by Obama stooges), and Mollie Hemingway.  Both ladies had very interesting stories to tell.  Mollie used to be an editor at Ricochet, before she went to The Federalist.

After a nice lunch and one more speaker, the conference adjourned.  We had a bit of time before we had to head back to Denver for our 8:00PM flight, so we went to the hotel bar for a quick drink.  The main building is across a small lake, and I got to capture some of the beauty of the resort on the way over.

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Once we arrived at the hotel bar and ordered our drinks, I had the opportunity to pay more attention to the inside of the bar.  Very beautiful! This picture must have been of some patrons from the Robber Baron days of the late 19th Century.  I didn’t find out who they all were.

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After our nice drink, it was time for us to head home.  As is my normal, I pay attention to architectural detail wherever I am!  Here are some creatures who saw us off from the main entrance.

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We made it back to the airport in time, dropped off the rental car, and boarded our plane.  It was a very rushed trip, but certainly productive. The venue was gorgeous, speakers were fascinating, and our friends warm.  What more could a person ask for?

 

Guest Author on Calling-all-RushBabes-Trolling in Downtown Seattle?

Guest Author on Calling-all-RushBabes-Trolling in Downtown Seattle?

My hubby has done an absolutely hilarious post over at Ricochet, and I just had to let my followers here see it.  The new mayor of Seattle is seriously considering imposition of “congestion pricing” to discourage people from driving into the city in their own automobiles, and “reduce vehicle emissions” to counter “climate change” (as if one city can have even a tiny effect on “climate change”!!)  This will make you laugh out loud!

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I couldn’t resist passing on this news item, inspired by Seattle Times staff reporter David Gutman.

Seattle will develop a plan to troll city roadways as part of its efforts to reduce traffic congestion and greenhouse-gas emissions, Mayor said Tuesday.

Details of what such a plan might look like are sparse, and will hinge on a trolling study focused on downtown neighborhoods that should have initial results later this year.

While several foreign cities use broad congestion-trolling schemes to reduce car and foot travel in their most-clogged downtown areas, no American city has established a similar widespread trolling system.

The mayor said she was hopeful a congestion-trolling system could be in place by the end of her first term, in 2021.

The mayor had said during her campaign last fall that the city should explore congestion trolling.

Seattle could implement trolling within the city without the permission of the state Legislature, but it would almost certainly require the approval of city voters.

In 2015, 56 percent of Puget Sound-area voters said systemwide trolling was a bad or very bad idea, according to a poll from the Puget Sound Regional Council.

Congestion trolling can take a number of forms, and it’s unclear which the city may pursue.

Hiring both homeless and introducing unwanted smartphone internet traffic to pester motorists and pedestrians on more heavily trafficked streets and byways would discourage rush-hour car, foot and bicycle traffic and would be employed as a form of congestion trolling. Electronic trolling of airwaves would jam normal internet access and replace expected internet traffic with offensive advertisements and social media attacks.

Similarly, so-called cordon trolling, where a heavily trafficked area (think downtown and South Lake Union) is virtually “cordoned” off, and trolls and electronic trolling are employed at the entrances to an area.

New York City has been discussing cordon trolling in Manhattan, without taking action, for more than a decade.

Congestion trolling is being proposed as part of a push to cut the city’s greenhouse-gas emissions and reduce economic activity. Seattle’s four previous mayors have all tried, and mostly failed, to reduce the city’s carbon output, as a booming population has offset decreases in per-person emissions.

Transportation is responsible for about two-thirds of Seattle’s greenhouse-gas emissions, and most of the mayor’s proposed changes focus on that sector.

The mayor also wants to make Seattle much more hospitable to electric cars. She said she will introduce legislation requiring that new developments (or renovations) that build parking also include electric-vehicle charging stations and would contain key software and hardware to defeat electronic trolling, at least until the city becomes overrun with electronic cars.

Decreases in tax revenues as a result of congestion trolling would be used to decrease transit service throughout the city and thereby reduce greenhouse-gas emissions further.

“We want to make it more uncomfortable for people to drive and walk downtown so they won’t want to come here,” she said. “We as a city and as a region have to make real on the promise of reduced emissions and commercial activity.”

The mayor’s radical climate action plan, spurred along by the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement, also aims to develop programs to decrease building energy use around the city by discouraging commercial activity.

“If our country is going to do anything significant on climate, the leadership has to come from states and cities,” the mayor said.

Actual tolling is already coming to downtown Seattle, with the opening of the Highway 99 tunnel, scheduled for later this year. But the state Transportation Commission continues to struggle deciding how much to toll and when to start tolling.

Whatever price the agency settles on, the tolls will cause some drivers to skip the tunnel, pushing more cars onto already suffocating downtown streets, creating increased demands on trolling to manage congestion.

That’s why, last year, the City Council authorized $200,000 to study the effects of the tunnel’s tolls and to explore congestion trolling in Seattle.

“The study would focus on the broader equity implications of congestion trolling in Seattle (particularly who is driving, bicycling and/or walking and at what times) and explore options, such as the idea of trolling downtown Seattle exits, to ensure that downtown homeless continue to have enough room to move around and find places to camp reliably,” the proposal for the study said.

City Councilperson, who proposed the study, said last fall the city was “a long ways” from considering congestion trolling but that the study would be useful information to have when that discussion did happen.

His office said Tuesday that the study would likely be put out for bid in the next couple of weeks and they hope for initial findings by October.

Durkan said that study would be the “starting point” for a plan on congestion trolling, “looking exactly where those corridors are where it makes sense both from a city betterment project and a greenhouse gas project.”

Seattle has studied congestion trolling previously.

A 2003 study by the Puget Sound Regional Council found that regionwide variable trolling — employing varying numbers of trolls on all major roads at different times — “could make excessive reoccurring congestion a thing of the past.”

A 2009 study, commissioned by the city, recommended trolls as a way to lower the city’s greenhouse- gas emissions, deal with congestion and decrease revenue.

And, while not anything like trolling, the state is currently studying a tax on every mile driven, as a way to replace the gas tax.

Foreign cities that have implemented widespread trolling — London, Stockholm and Milan are prominent examples — have generally faced public opposition that faded away after the system was put in place and traffic congestion decreased. And the homeless people were much happier.

“Roadway trolling tends to poll poorly,” Matthew Gibson, an economist at Williams College who has studied trolling, said in an interview last year. “After people experience it for a while, support tends to increase.”

New York City is the only other American city to look seriously at congestion trolling, but it has repeatedly backed away.

Just last week, New York legislators agreed on a budget that did not include Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s much-discussed proposal for imposition of nearly 12 trolls to drive into midtown Manhattan.

A Pretty Good Argument Against Only Owning an Electric Car

A Pretty Good Argument Against Only Owning an Electric Car

This past weekend, my hubby and I were watching TV (pretty rare for us), and he tuned in to the NHK World program, an English feature of the Japanese network NHK.  They had a very interesting program dealing with how technology helps Japan deal with the many natural disasters they face, living on the Ring of Fire.  They showed a special floodgate that can redirect flood waters with no human assistance.  And they spoke with a Japanese farmer who told how he dealt with the inability to use his cellular phone, in the aftermath of a big earthquake that knocked out all power to his area for weeks.

This put me in mind of how bad his situation would have been if his only transportation had been an electric vehicle.  If the power goes out to your neighborhood, or your entire city for longer than a day or two, you might be stranded.  Your “vehicle” would be nothing more than a big lump of toxic waste (think how hard it will be to recycle that huge battery) sitting in your driveway, or your barn.  What about the city which prohibits any but electric vehicles in its limits?  What happens if that city is flooded with 6 feet of muddy water?  Needless to say, all the electric vehicles would be deathtraps, and totally useless for evacuation.  And all those people would have no way out.

Just look at what happened to Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria hit last year.  In February, many people there were still without power!  Those people can get power with gas-powered generators-fossil fuels!  If they had had electric cars, those would have been totally useless.

Many political units have already stated that they will be prohibiting “fossil-fuel” vehicles within the next 10-20 years.  I know for a fact that their desire to “go green”, and to force their citizens to do so, was not thought through very well.  And my prediction is that it will not happen in 20 years, nor in 40 years.    They will discover that mandating electric vehicles would be a very poor policy, and cause more undesirable effects than beneficial effects.  Oh, and it would be absolutely useless in “saving the planet”, since the planet is bigger than they are, and not in need of saving.   Citizens can stock up on gasoline to prepare for a possible disaster.  They can’t stock up on electricity.

It’s A Miracle!

It’s a miracle of modern technology and medicine.  See the picture below.

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This is me.  I now look like this all day while I’m awake.  Please notice that I am not wearing glasses.  For the first time in 63 years, I can see the world without Coke-bottle glasses, and that’s a miracle in my book.

I have had cataracts for many years, and they got worse within the last two years.  I had to start taking my glasses off to read, about a year ago.  I started having trouble reading my computer screen at work, which was very annoying.  So I made an appointment with the ophthalmologist at my local clinic.  We discussed what my options were, and I decided to have cataract surgery, and get implanted lenses, which would correct for both of my problems (nearsightedness and astigmatism).  This would be expensive, but that’s what I have savings for.

Last Tuesday morning, I had the first of two surgeries, on the left eye, which is the worst. I arrived at the clinic around 8AM, and there was an extensive pre-op routine where they put what seemed like a liter of various eye-drops in my eye, and inserted a Luer-lock port in my hand to allow IV sedation during the surgery.  That was the only painful part, and it wasn’t very painful.  Around 9AM, they wheeled me into the OR, and I introduced myself to the doctor and nurses.  The anesthesiologist injected the sedative, and I was draped with sterile drapes, and my face was cleaned with old-fashioned Betadine.  I got more eye-drops, and the surgery itself began.  You may not believe this, but I actually enjoyed the surgery while it was going in.  I was awake, and it looked to me like a light-show of various colored shapes.  I remember thinking that if I were an artist, I would like to paint what I saw. [I apologize if this gives you the willies].

The operation took about 15 minutes, and I was wheeled back into the Recovery area.  After about a half-hour of recovery, and finally being able to drink something (no food or drinks after midnight the night before is standard), hubby brought the car around, and we went home.  I could already see that the surgery was a success.  I could see things out of the left eye, like the clock display in the car, that were a blur to the right eye.  I had a feeling that this would be life-changing for me.  We got home, and I finally had breakfast.  I went home with three different eye drops, which I had to use every two hours while awake for the first two days.  What a pain!  After breakfast, I decided to just go back to bed, and I slept about four hours.  When I got up, I started getting used to my new vision.  For the first day, it looked like there was a gauzy curtain over the world, but that dissipated by Tuesday night.

I discovered that the human brain doesn’t take long to compensate for the different vision-capabilities in the two eyes.  When looking at distant objects, everything is clear, even though one eye is still uncorrected.  It is really remarkable when I cover my right eye and only look through the left.  I can see!!!!  I see my bedside clock without having to squint.

The next day, Wednesday, Hubby drove me to an 8AM post-op appointment at the clinic.  The nurse tested my vision, and my left eye, which was 20/200, tested at 20/25!  It’s not perfect, but it really is an earth-shaking improvement.  I don’t have the superlatives to describe how wonderful it is to be able to see without glasses.  That evening, I had my second wonderful experience.  I took a shower, and was able to see everything in the bathtub!  I will never again lose the sponge if I drop it on the floor.  I can see where the drips are, and wipe them off.

I went back to work on Thursday, and it was an adventure.  No more washing my glasses when they get dusty.  I can see my computer monitors without squinting, and unfortunately I can see clearly all the emails in my inbox! [I have limited backup in my department, so every little issue has to wait for me to return if I’m out]  I was pleased when two of my coworkers said I looked ten years younger.  After work, I had another new experience.  I had a haircut, and I could actually see what the hairdresser was doing while she worked!  In the past, I had to remove my glasses, and just trust that she was doing what I wanted, and now I can watch.  This is heaven!

The “intra-ocular lens” technology has been around for a while, but it’s only fairly recently that it became advanced enough to correct astigmatism.  I have always been in awe of the things human ingenuity has been able to accomplish, and I never take any of it for granted.  As the population of most countries ages, this kind of surgery is becoming more common, and eye surgeons do thousands every month.  It is minimally-invasive, ambulatory surgery, and has become almost commonplace in most advanced countries.  Medicare and most insurance plans cover it, so if it is recommended, there should be few if any obstacles to a person being able to get back nearly-perfect vision.

I am looking forward to getting the right eye done in two weeks.  I am also looking eagerly forward to joining the ranks of people who keep losing their sunglasses!  I can now go out and shop for fashion non-prescription sunglasses to take on our cruise to Hawaii in July.  The doctor said I might also need reading glasses for close work, so I can shop for those too, and become a member of the “left their reading-glasses somewhere” tribe.  It is fortunate that Costco sells them in packs of four!  I am going to be enjoying this miracle of good vision without glasses, for a very long time.  It’s a miracle!

…On the Other Hand… 2017 Wrap-up

…On the Other Hand… 2017 Wrap-up

2017 was an “on the other hand” year for RushBabe49.  For every great thing that happened, there was something disgusting in return.  No good thing goes un-punished, and 2017 was a great example.  Starting in January with the inauguration of duly-elected President Donald Trump.  Election night in 2016 was the most fun I had had in years, spending hours on the live chat on Ricochet.  Many members’ comments were priceless, and when we went to bed that night (some stayed up until the wee hours of the next morning) we were elated.  But the Left’s tantrums at having been defeated were not terribly unexpected, but they were more violent than we thought.  The “Resistance” was immediate and loud, and we have been putting up with it for the entire year.

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This response shows the level of culture of the majority of leftists.  They immediately start with the worst curse words they can come up with.  Too bad, President Trump remained in office.  The resistance was also widespread within the bureaucracy in DC, and every one of the new president’s appointments was drawn-out and fought tooth and nail by the “deep state”.  I remember being on a trip in February, and being regaled by all the crap thrown at Michael Flynn, who was forced out of his position for communicating with the Russian ambassador, which was part of his job!

The Deep State and the Democrat Senate Losers tried their best, but they could not stop the nomination and confirmation of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, one of President Trump’s most important achievements in his first year in office.  President Trump has also had confirmed twelve new federal Circuit Court judges, a victory for Constitutionalism.

On the other hand, 2017 was marked by numerous murders of police officers, many in ambush situations, all over the United States.  By July, the total of police officers killed in the line of duty had risen nearly 20% from 2016.  The Ferguson Effect, where community members not only do not help the police solve local crimes, but positively hinder them, was much in evidence.  The murder rate in cities like Chicago and Baltimore skyrocketed, as gang members felt more comfortable carrying on their wars in many neighborhoods.

The employment situation in the US improved in 2017, as companies brought jobs back from overseas and opened new factories.  About 1.7 million new jobs were created in Donald Trump’s economy, and the stock markets reached new record-highs multiple times throughout the year.  Locally, tech companies have been on hiring sprees, with software engineers and systems analysts able to field multiple job offers and basically write their own tickets.

On the other hand, the cost of living in many big cities has also gone up so high as to price non-techies out of the housing market.  Landlords raise rents, and ordinary working stiffs have to leave town to find places they can afford to live.  Those of us who own our homes already just face increasing property taxes and utility fees, but we can remain in our homes.

On the other hand, we saw huge data-breaches that exposed the personal information of hundreds of millions of Americans, who had NO choice of where their data were stored.  The big breach at the credit-reporting giant Equifax brought it home to Americans how fragile their hold is on their privacy.  The subject of cyber-security was a big one in 2017, and promises to remain so in the new year, and for the foreseeable future.

President Donald Trump’s 2017 economy also brought the opening up of the Keystone XL and Dakota Access oil pipelines and the opening up of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in places to oil exploration to increase America’s energy independence.  And the best news of all, the most consequential tax reform of recent history was passed in December, ensuring that the majority of Americans will see the government confiscating less of their hard-earned money.  The tax bill repealed the individual mandate of ObamaCare, so many young people will not be required to purchase unaffordable health “insurance” or pay a huge fine/tax.  Since their employers will also be paying less to Uncle Sam, employees may get another benefit from the new tax laws.  Many big companies have already announced special bonuses for their employees (including those sleazy liberal TV commentators who swore the bill was horrible for the country).

President Trump’s foreign policies have also borne fruit, with ISIS being deprived of most of the territory they held, the UN de-funded of $285 million, and Jerusalem being declared the Capital of the State of Israel.  We have now brought the Israelis back as our friends, when the Obama administration had denigrated them and sided with the anti-Semites in Europe.

On the other hand, 2017 has brought increasing conflict (mostly words so far on our part) with the madman at the head of North Korea, and the mullahs who still rule in Iran.  But President Trump is doing his best to unravel the one-sided Iran nuclear “deal” which was a terrible bargain for the US.  2018 is bound to bring more tensions on those fronts, but America will now be dealing from a position of Greatness, not leading from behind.

Illegal immigration to the United States has gone down dramatically since Donald Trump was elected, and that is in the absence of the border wall!  This shows that even the expectation of action can affect the behavior of those who might be affected by the action.  On the other hand, the “deep state” judiciary has continued to throw obstacles in the way of the President’s legitimate power to allow or not allow anyone to enter the US.  This makes me very angry, and so far every one of the “bans of bans” that makes it to the Supreme Court gets overturned.  I hope that in the New Year the Supreme Court will be able to finally rule that the Executive Branch is solely in charge of immigration policy.

Personally, my own situation has remained very good in 2017 and going into the new year.  Hubby and I are still gainfully-employed, mostly healthy, and comfortable in our home, with our owner, Kikyo the black cat.  I again played the full-length Messiah the day after Christmas, and was just transported by the wonderful singing of the choir; an excellent end to the season.

I extend my best wishes to all my readers and followers at Calling-All-RushBabes for a very Happy New Year of 2018.

Oh, yes, here are my two last photos of 2017, taken on a shopping trip this afternoon.

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Seattle Liberals-stuck on stupid with their Sweetened Beverage Tax

On January 1, Seattle initiates a new “sweetened beverage tax”, of $0.0175 per OUNCE of sweetened beverage (Coke, Pepsi, Simply Lemonade, VitaminWater…).  Below is information I copied off the City of Seattle Web site.  Now, the reason for this tax in the first place is to make the citizens of Seattle healthier by making it more expensive to drink those evil sweetened beverages.  Except that…wait for it…they say below that the tax is NOT INTENDED TO BE PASSED ON TO THE CONSUMER!
Now, what are the chances that the beverage distributors will simply eat the huge cost of this tax?  Yes, about zero.  They will certainly pass the cost on to the retailers who stock the beverages, who will increase the cost to consumers.  The tax will about double the cost of a 21-ounce bottle of soda. **The tax on one 12-pack of 12-ounce cans will be $2.52, which is about the wholesale price of that 12-pack!!!
Cook County (Chicago) tried this a while ago.  And you know what happened?  Well, citizens of Cook County simply traveled a few miles, across the county line, and bought their sweetened beverages in the suburbs and towns next door.  Distributors laid off employees, due to the reduced business within the city.  And the county made very little money from the tax.  So it was repealed.
Liberals always assume that when they levy a tax on an activity or a commodity, those subject to the tax will simply pay up.  Well, they don’t!  If you tax something, you get less of it, which liberals never seem to learn.  The city of Seattle states that the tax is not intended to be passed on to consumers, but they seem never to have heard of the law of unintended consequences.  When people get taxed, they tend to change their behavior.  When the price of cigarettes skyrockets in a municipality or state, cigarette smuggling skyrockets.  When the cost of a sweetened beverage doubles in the City of Seattle, I predict that citizens will simply make a run to the new Lynnwood Costco to stock up on Coke or Pepsi.  Costco even carries VitaminWater now, so they can save even more.  I wonder if Seattle will pass a new law outlawing the carrying of sweetened beverages across the city limits?  Another question: how much additional business will Seattle retailers lose due to this tax?   Probably few people go shopping just for beverages, so how much additional revenue will Seattle stores lose when residents simply do all their grocery shopping outside the city?
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SWEETENED BEVERAGE TAX (SEATTLE)

Beginning Jan. 1, 2018, the City of Seattle will impose a sweetened beverage tax. View Ordinance 125324.

The sweetened beverage tax is a tax on the distribution of sweetened beverages in the city of Seattle. The tax is collected on the final distribution of sweetened beverages by a distributor. The tax is not collected by the retailer nor is the tax burden intended to fall onto the consumer. The intent of the sweetened beverage tax is to tax the distributions of sweetened beverages into Seattle for retail sale in Seattle.

For more information, please review:

If you have questions or concerns, contact SweetenedBevTax@seattle.gov.

Tax rate

The standard tax rate for the sweetened beverage tax is $.0175 per ounce. There is a reduced tax rate for certified manufacturers. That rate is $.01 per ounce.   ***Editorial comment by RushBabe49:  Which manufacturers in Seattle will voluntarily pay that exorbitant tax on their legitimately-produced soda?  Might those businesses simply write off Seattle and move their factories outside the city?  If they do, how much B & O tax revenue will Seattle be losing?

Guidelines to follow

Distributors are liable for the sweetened beverage tax on distributions of sweetened beverages into Seattle for retail sale in Seattle. Distributors need to file the sweetened beverage tax online at https://www.filelocal-wa.gov/. Distributors will either file annually or quarterly; following the same schedule as its B&O tax filing due dates. The imposition of the tax does not begin until Jan. 1, 2018. For quarterly tax filers, the first due date to remit the tax will be April 30, 2018.

Exemption from the sweetened beverage tax

If a distributor sells products from a certified small manufacturer (annual worldwide gross revenue of $2 million or less), those sales are exempt from taxation. The manufacturer must apply for the exemption with the City.

Reduced tax rate

If a distributor sells products from a certified manufacturer that has worldwide gross revenue of over $2 million but less than $5 million, those sales are eligible for a reduced tax rate ($.01/ounce). The manufacturer must apply for the reduced rate certification with the City.

Additional exemptions

For a listing of sweetened beverages that are exempt from the sweetened beverage tax, please see Seattle Rule 5-953.

Redistribution Certificate

The intent of the Redistribution Certificate is to ensure that the tax only applies to distribution of sweetened beverages for retail sale in Seattle. Retail businesses that receive distributions of sweetened beverages in the city of Seattle but then redistribute some or all of the sweetened beverages for retail sale outside the city may issue redistribution certificates to distributors. The retailer then becomes responsible for remitting the tax to the City only on those sweetened beverages receipted and sold at retail in Seattle.  ***Editorial Comment from RushBabe49:  Just read this paragraph-can you imagine the labor involved in determining when this rule applies?  What distributor will do this?***

In accordance with Seattle Rule 5-953 Sweetened Beverage Tax, this certificate may be completed by a person who requests to the distributor that they be liable for the sweetened beverage tax on sweetened beverages ultimately distributed for retail sale in Seattle.

Any distributor that accepts a Redistribution Certificate must provide a copy of the completed certificate to the City of Seattle within 15 days of receipt and the distributor will receive a confirmation of receipt from the City. The Redistribution Certificate is only valid with a confirmation receipt from the City of Seattle.

Distributors that accept a Redistribution Certificate must remit a copy by fax to (206) 684-5170 or by email to sweetenedbevtax@seattle.gov.

Read the code

You can read the Seattle Municipal Code (SMC) for legal details about the sweetened beverage tax.

SMC Chapter 5.53 covers the sweetened beverage tax.

Seattle business tax rule 5-953 provides further information.

A Short ECON101 Lesson about Taxes

A Short ECON101 Lesson about Taxes

Right now, the US Congress is hashing out a “tax reform” set of bills intended to change the ways taxes are confiscated from American workers and savers.  Those on the Left often refer to “tax cuts for the rich”, showing their basic envy of people who actually EARN their livings in the real world.  Republicans, in the majority in both the House and Senate, and in possession of the White House, consider it their responsibility to reduce the tax burden on working and saving Americans.

The concept of “revenue neutrality” was originated by Democrats who are horrified at the thought of Government receiving one fewer cent of its lifeblood from those Americans who pay income taxes (currently just slightly over 50% of Americans).  A young member over at Ricochet opines that the current tax scheme MUST be “revenue neutral”, as the Federal Government is already overdrawn on its accounts and can’t tolerate any reduction in its “income”.

That is not true, and here’s why.

Reductions in Tax Rates, especially for high-earners, always result in more revenue for the government (small and large business owners keep more of their earnings, add employees to their payrolls, and create more taxpayers). Why is this so hard for people to understand? This is Econ 101. And why, oh why, should the all-mighty Government not shrink? Why can’t waste be eliminated from all levels of Government? The less Government confiscates from your paycheck, the more you have to spend, and save!

The problem is that those in Government do not trust their fellow Americans, who pay their salaries from their own legitimate earnings, to know how to allocate their own money. “Revenue Neutral” is a crock!