Photo Challenge..Prolific Singers and Musicians

Every year on the day after Christmas, the University Unitarian Church in Seattle puts on a full-length Handel’s Messiah Sing-along/Play-along.  They do the full Messiah, all the arias, all the choruses, and all the recitatives; not a note is left out.  Everyone sings everything that is within his or her vocal range-no soloists.  You may even hear some of the musicians singing along.  They pack the place to the rafters with singers and musicians.  Performers spend three hours at it (two intermissions), and are exhausted at the end.  There are very few experiences that are as exhilarating as playing or singing the complete Messiah.  Here are some pictures from last year, taken from my place in the Violin I section.

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Whirlwind Trip to Colorado, Hillsdale National Leadership Seminar

Last week, RB49 and Hubby flew to Denver for a Hillsdale College National Leadership Seminar.  I usually have an aisle seat on an airplane, but this time I had the window seat, and I saw some beautiful scenery below.

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We picked up the rental SUV, and drove south to the city of Colorado Springs, where we found the Broadmoor Resort, a very old, and very beautiful, hotel at the foot of the Rocky Mountains.  We barely had time to get settled in our beautiful room, before it was time to attend the President’s Club reception.  Here’s the view from our room.

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At the reception, we met up with some people we already knew from Ricochet, one couple who live in Colorado Springs, and a woman from Texas (yes, Hillsdale has supporters all over this country).  We went in to dinner, and had a very nice meal.  Tuesday’s dinner was Frank Luntz, a well-known pollster, who told us that he became a conservative gradually, while learning about what motivates the people he polled over the years.  His theme was “how to speak about conservatism”, and he emphasized some of the points I have been saying over the years (you can’t convert liberals by arguing with them-you need to appeal to their emotions).  Here’s one of the many slides he showed about better terms to use in your conversations.

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After that dinner, Hubby and I went on a little walking tour of the building.  The Broadmoor has dozens of original paintings and sculptures by Western artists, accumulated over the more than 100-year history of the property.

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In a dimly-lighted lounge, I spotted this cleverly-designed footstool.  Very cute!

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Can you tell that he’s a turtle?

We fell into bed, exhausted from our busy day.  The room was sumptuous by our standards, and very comfortable and quiet, even though it was just across the hall from the elevator.

The next day, after continental breakfast, there were more speakers, including Sharyl Atkisson, a rather famous journalist (whose computer was compromised by Obama stooges), and Mollie Hemingway.  Both ladies had very interesting stories to tell.  Mollie used to be an editor at Ricochet, before she went to The Federalist.

After a nice lunch and one more speaker, the conference adjourned.  We had a bit of time before we had to head back to Denver for our 8:00PM flight, so we went to the hotel bar for a quick drink.  The main building is across a small lake, and I got to capture some of the beauty of the resort on the way over.

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Once we arrived at the hotel bar and ordered our drinks, I had the opportunity to pay more attention to the inside of the bar.  Very beautiful! This picture must have been of some patrons from the Robber Baron days of the late 19th Century.  I didn’t find out who they all were.

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After our nice drink, it was time for us to head home.  As is my normal, I pay attention to architectural detail wherever I am!  Here are some creatures who saw us off from the main entrance.

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We made it back to the airport in time, dropped off the rental car, and boarded our plane.  It was a very rushed trip, but certainly productive. The venue was gorgeous, speakers were fascinating, and our friends warm.  What more could a person ask for?

 

Guest Author on Calling-all-RushBabes-Trolling in Downtown Seattle?

Guest Author on Calling-all-RushBabes-Trolling in Downtown Seattle?

My hubby has done an absolutely hilarious post over at Ricochet, and I just had to let my followers here see it.  The new mayor of Seattle is seriously considering imposition of “congestion pricing” to discourage people from driving into the city in their own automobiles, and “reduce vehicle emissions” to counter “climate change” (as if one city can have even a tiny effect on “climate change”!!)  This will make you laugh out loud!

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I couldn’t resist passing on this news item, inspired by Seattle Times staff reporter David Gutman.

Seattle will develop a plan to troll city roadways as part of its efforts to reduce traffic congestion and greenhouse-gas emissions, Mayor said Tuesday.

Details of what such a plan might look like are sparse, and will hinge on a trolling study focused on downtown neighborhoods that should have initial results later this year.

While several foreign cities use broad congestion-trolling schemes to reduce car and foot travel in their most-clogged downtown areas, no American city has established a similar widespread trolling system.

The mayor said she was hopeful a congestion-trolling system could be in place by the end of her first term, in 2021.

The mayor had said during her campaign last fall that the city should explore congestion trolling.

Seattle could implement trolling within the city without the permission of the state Legislature, but it would almost certainly require the approval of city voters.

In 2015, 56 percent of Puget Sound-area voters said systemwide trolling was a bad or very bad idea, according to a poll from the Puget Sound Regional Council.

Congestion trolling can take a number of forms, and it’s unclear which the city may pursue.

Hiring both homeless and introducing unwanted smartphone internet traffic to pester motorists and pedestrians on more heavily trafficked streets and byways would discourage rush-hour car, foot and bicycle traffic and would be employed as a form of congestion trolling. Electronic trolling of airwaves would jam normal internet access and replace expected internet traffic with offensive advertisements and social media attacks.

Similarly, so-called cordon trolling, where a heavily trafficked area (think downtown and South Lake Union) is virtually “cordoned” off, and trolls and electronic trolling are employed at the entrances to an area.

New York City has been discussing cordon trolling in Manhattan, without taking action, for more than a decade.

Congestion trolling is being proposed as part of a push to cut the city’s greenhouse-gas emissions and reduce economic activity. Seattle’s four previous mayors have all tried, and mostly failed, to reduce the city’s carbon output, as a booming population has offset decreases in per-person emissions.

Transportation is responsible for about two-thirds of Seattle’s greenhouse-gas emissions, and most of the mayor’s proposed changes focus on that sector.

The mayor also wants to make Seattle much more hospitable to electric cars. She said she will introduce legislation requiring that new developments (or renovations) that build parking also include electric-vehicle charging stations and would contain key software and hardware to defeat electronic trolling, at least until the city becomes overrun with electronic cars.

Decreases in tax revenues as a result of congestion trolling would be used to decrease transit service throughout the city and thereby reduce greenhouse-gas emissions further.

“We want to make it more uncomfortable for people to drive and walk downtown so they won’t want to come here,” she said. “We as a city and as a region have to make real on the promise of reduced emissions and commercial activity.”

The mayor’s radical climate action plan, spurred along by the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement, also aims to develop programs to decrease building energy use around the city by discouraging commercial activity.

“If our country is going to do anything significant on climate, the leadership has to come from states and cities,” the mayor said.

Actual tolling is already coming to downtown Seattle, with the opening of the Highway 99 tunnel, scheduled for later this year. But the state Transportation Commission continues to struggle deciding how much to toll and when to start tolling.

Whatever price the agency settles on, the tolls will cause some drivers to skip the tunnel, pushing more cars onto already suffocating downtown streets, creating increased demands on trolling to manage congestion.

That’s why, last year, the City Council authorized $200,000 to study the effects of the tunnel’s tolls and to explore congestion trolling in Seattle.

“The study would focus on the broader equity implications of congestion trolling in Seattle (particularly who is driving, bicycling and/or walking and at what times) and explore options, such as the idea of trolling downtown Seattle exits, to ensure that downtown homeless continue to have enough room to move around and find places to camp reliably,” the proposal for the study said.

City Councilperson, who proposed the study, said last fall the city was “a long ways” from considering congestion trolling but that the study would be useful information to have when that discussion did happen.

His office said Tuesday that the study would likely be put out for bid in the next couple of weeks and they hope for initial findings by October.

Durkan said that study would be the “starting point” for a plan on congestion trolling, “looking exactly where those corridors are where it makes sense both from a city betterment project and a greenhouse gas project.”

Seattle has studied congestion trolling previously.

A 2003 study by the Puget Sound Regional Council found that regionwide variable trolling — employing varying numbers of trolls on all major roads at different times — “could make excessive reoccurring congestion a thing of the past.”

A 2009 study, commissioned by the city, recommended trolls as a way to lower the city’s greenhouse- gas emissions, deal with congestion and decrease revenue.

And, while not anything like trolling, the state is currently studying a tax on every mile driven, as a way to replace the gas tax.

Foreign cities that have implemented widespread trolling — London, Stockholm and Milan are prominent examples — have generally faced public opposition that faded away after the system was put in place and traffic congestion decreased. And the homeless people were much happier.

“Roadway trolling tends to poll poorly,” Matthew Gibson, an economist at Williams College who has studied trolling, said in an interview last year. “After people experience it for a while, support tends to increase.”

New York City is the only other American city to look seriously at congestion trolling, but it has repeatedly backed away.

Just last week, New York legislators agreed on a budget that did not include Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s much-discussed proposal for imposition of nearly 12 trolls to drive into midtown Manhattan.

A Pretty Good Argument Against Only Owning an Electric Car

A Pretty Good Argument Against Only Owning an Electric Car

This past weekend, my hubby and I were watching TV (pretty rare for us), and he tuned in to the NHK World program, an English feature of the Japanese network NHK.  They had a very interesting program dealing with how technology helps Japan deal with the many natural disasters they face, living on the Ring of Fire.  They showed a special floodgate that can redirect flood waters with no human assistance.  And they spoke with a Japanese farmer who told how he dealt with the inability to use his cellular phone, in the aftermath of a big earthquake that knocked out all power to his area for weeks.

This put me in mind of how bad his situation would have been if his only transportation had been an electric vehicle.  If the power goes out to your neighborhood, or your entire city for longer than a day or two, you might be stranded.  Your “vehicle” would be nothing more than a big lump of toxic waste (think how hard it will be to recycle that huge battery) sitting in your driveway, or your barn.  What about the city which prohibits any but electric vehicles in its limits?  What happens if that city is flooded with 6 feet of muddy water?  Needless to say, all the electric vehicles would be deathtraps, and totally useless for evacuation.  And all those people would have no way out.

Just look at what happened to Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria hit last year.  In February, many people there were still without power!  Those people can get power with gas-powered generators-fossil fuels!  If they had had electric cars, those would have been totally useless.

Many political units have already stated that they will be prohibiting “fossil-fuel” vehicles within the next 10-20 years.  I know for a fact that their desire to “go green”, and to force their citizens to do so, was not thought through very well.  And my prediction is that it will not happen in 20 years, nor in 40 years.    They will discover that mandating electric vehicles would be a very poor policy, and cause more undesirable effects than beneficial effects.  Oh, and it would be absolutely useless in “saving the planet”, since the planet is bigger than they are, and not in need of saving.   Citizens can stock up on gasoline to prepare for a possible disaster.  They can’t stock up on electricity.

Photo Challenge~~~I’d Rather Be…

So here I am, at my desk, doing our TAXES, for heaven’s sake!  Yeah, it’s that time of year. But I’d really rather be here:

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On the balcony of our stateroom, on the cruise ship, to Hawaii.  With my nose in a good book, and a nice glass of wine.  Just relaxing and watching and listening to the water go by.

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Actually, we are going on that Hawaii cruise this summer, round trip from San Francisco, for the last two weeks of July.  The open Pacific Ocean beckons!

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International Women’s Day, NOT celebrated here

International Women’s Day, NOT celebrated here

And here’s why, from Wikipedia:

International Women’s Day (IWD) is celebrated on March 8 every year.[3] It commemorates the movement for women’s rights.[citation needed]

March 8 was suggested by the 1910 International Socialist Woman’s Conference to become an “International Woman’s Day.” After women gained suffrage in Soviet Russia in 1917, March 8 became a national holiday there. The day was then predominantly celebrated by the socialist movement and communist countries until it was adopted in 1975 by the United Nations.

Sorry, but Calling-all-RushBabes does not celebrate Soviet, Socialist holidays.

One more thing..take a look at the woman in my Featured Image in the head-to-toe burqa.  Do you think her husband celebrates her?  NO-she does not leave the house unless covered!  Oppression, it looks like.