Calling All RushBabes and Followers–Join Ricochet!

Just about the smartest thing I have done in recent years (aside from starting this blog) was to join Ricochet.  Through the Center-Right Community of thoughtful, smart, and welcoming people, I have made new friends, expanded my knowledge, and partaken of some of the world’s best humor.  Doesn’t it seem to you that much of society has totally lost its sense of humor?  Lena Dunham, that sleazy “feminist” has pioneered “that’s not funny” in response to any attempts to see the world as anything but apocalyptic.

On Ricochet, however, we have “Mac and Wally”, an original cartoon series by member Chip Head, whose two black and white dogs converse in some of the best one-liners ever.  But you have to be a Ricochet member to read them.  We also have Ten Cents, one of our members who lives in Japan, and whose avatar picture is a sock puppet with a mustache.  He is the pun-master of the world, and many members can keep a conversation going for days with more and more elaborate puns.  You just can’t read these posts without laughing.

Ricochet also has sober conversations going, about subjects that interest aware conservatives everywhere.  We are having the usual arguments back and forth over the upcoming presidential election.  We have our “Trumpists” and our Never-Trumpers, and the conversations can get heated at times.  But we have a Code of Conduct, and members who live by it, and keep the conversations civil most of the time.  We have Member Moderators who can intervene if they see a conversation running off the rails.  Nobody resents their presence, and we engage them in conversations about the C of C all the time.

What you will almost never find on Ricochet is real nastiness.  No death threats, no vulgar language, and few ad-hominem attacks.  Our Members are erudite, passionate, and caring conservatives and libertarians mostly.  They have expertise in every subject known to man, and they often do very interesting posts about what they do for a living.  We have a member who is a concrete contractor, who did a post once about “everything you ever wanted to know about concrete”, and it drew dozens of comments and questions.  We have a whole slew of teachers, from grade school to graduate school, who keep us informed about the goings-on in the education sphere.  We even have celebrity contributors who post from time to time.  Like Pat Sajac, and James Pethokoukis.

And Ricochet isn’t just an online community.  We have face-to-face meetings, at all corners of the US and around the world.  Yes, we have had meetups in Paris, Rome, London, and elsewhere.  We have members in many countries and every state of the Union.  We have members in Australia and Japan.  If you join Ricochet, wherever you travel there will be a member to meet you and show you around.  Just this past weekend, my husband and I met with two other local members at a park near Olympia, and had a great time getting to know each other.  The best part of Ricochet is the people.

Here at Calling-all-RushBabes, I have done many posts (and linked to my YouTube site) about my experiences as a Ricochet member.  Read them, and you will see how wonderful and fulfilling it is to be a member.  Right now, Ricochet is running a special promotion.  Join now, and you get two free months.  Here are links to a few.

https://rushbabe49.com/2015/04/11/as-usual-dave-carter-on-ricochet-says-it-better/

https://rushbabe49.com/2015/09/21/a-trip-to-reno-lake-tahoe/

Centralia meetup.

Phoenix meetup.

Please take a chance, and improve your life by becoming a Ricochet member.  I guarantee that you will never regret it.  And if you decide to join, post a comment here so I can welcome you over there!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Rare

This is a small pipe organ, manufactured in Estonia in 1844.  Today, it resides in the Sitka Lutheran Church, in Alaska.  I’m guessing that there aren’t very many of these around.

These are two views of the back of the organ.  Here’s my husband playing it, to give you an idea of why I couldn’t get a picture of the keyboard.  Nowhere to stand!

HubbyPlaying Organ

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Picking up Where Rush Left Off

Yeah, I’m way behind on my podcast listening.  The one I listened to today was the end of July sometime.  He recited a list of  “what the Democrat Party is”, entities and causes that many people don’t know were Dem strongholds.  He started with the ones that are most obvious in today’s news:

Black Lives Matter

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New Black Panthers

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Illegal immigrants

Occupy Wall Street

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Striking the mention of God from their party platform

Transgender bathroom advocates

Pro “death panels” in ObamaCare

Pedophiles (Bill Clinton’s billionaire buddy)

Baby butchers of Planned Parenthood

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And I thought of some that he didn’t mention:

The Ku Klux Klan

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Felons (VA governor restores their civil rights so they can be a new Democrat voting bloc)

George Wallace, the famous segregationist of the 1960s

Homosexual activists who put small businesses out of business if they won’t participate in ceremonies that are against their religious beliefs

Stoners, pot-smokers, and other drug-users

Politicians who boast of destroying an entire industry (coal-mining) and putting thousands of workers out of jobs

High-speed trains to nowhere

Carbon taxes that increase the cost of living for everyone, especially the lower-earning people

Slavery-the congresspeople who opposed Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation were Democrats!

Something for all you millennials who vote Democrat without thinking, to think upon.

What I did on my Summer Vacation

Hubby and I went on the Hillsdale College 10-day cruise to Alaska, aboard the Crystal Serenity.  We spent about three years’ worth of travel budget, but we sure got our money’s worth, and more.  Hillsdale does a big cruise every summer, and this was our first time.  There were “Seminars at Sea”, with noted speakers, including Michael Walsh, screenwriter and author; Victor Davis Hanson, Classicist and thinker; David Goldman, journalist, and John Steele Gordon, historian.  There were shore excursions at every stop (I didn’t do any, and hubby did one, walking on a glacier).  We mostly did our own exploring, traipsing through Juneau, Skagway, Sitka, and Ketchikan.

The luxury ship was everything we expected.  Lavish breakfast buffet with every kind of food you could possibly want, lunch in the Grill, or The Bistro, and dinners in the ritzy Crystal Dining Room.  There were two specialty restaurants, one Asian and one Italian, and we had delightful dinners at both.  There was a full movie theater playing first-run movies, and we took the opportunity to see Jungle Book, which was fun and well-done.  I had a pedicure in the Spa, and had a nice conversation with the technician, a beautiful young lady from North Yorkshire.

My favorite part of cruising is relaxing on deck and watching the water go by, and I had ample opportunity to sit out on our private verandah on the starboard side of the ship, with my camera and binoculars at the ready.  As usual, I was a picture-taking fool, see below.

On the final day, the last stop was Nanaimo, British Columbia, and we were met by a Ricochet member who is now our friend.  He took us on a nice stroll by the waterfront, we had a very good pizza lunch, then went back to his home for more good conversation on his patio.

Here is a selection of the photos I took.

This is Vancouver harbor, with the cruise ship terminal.

BeautifulVancouver

Here’s an example of a working waterfront.  It’s almost like a ballet, the way the tugboat maneuvers the barge.

Tug-barge-Vand

It was such a beautiful afternoon, I basically stood on deck with my camera until the sun went down.  Sunset over the Inside Passage.

Sunset-0727

The next day was spent entirely at sea, and we had lectures most of the day.  I tried to get outside as much as I could.  I took lots of pictures of the ship itself, which I found gorgeous.  I did a double-take when I saw this tiny detail that most people probably would miss.  Crystal Cruises logo is two seahorses.  Here’s an interesting place for it.

Seahorses

Yes, that’s the sandbox used for people to stub out their cigarettes!  This is the pool.  Notice that it’s empty-there was only one pool, and it didn’t get much use.

LidoDeck-pool

This is what I gazed upon from the Promenade Deck (the only level with an outside walkway all the way around the vessel.

Sea-and-sky-0728

Inside, these ladies were playing beautiful string quartet music, in the Crystal Cove.  They are the Astoria Quartet, and they are all from Russia.  Also note the piano, and the chairs the ladies are sitting on-Crystal!

AstoriaQuartet

Juneau was the first port of call, and I took pictures of the channel approaching town, the town itself, and some of the other ships and boats in port.

Juneau-Channel

Juneau-hillside

That’s a little river, cascading down the hillside-you can see how its path traces from the top to the bottom of the hill.  Too bad it was very misty that day.

Juneau

This is the cruise ship Disney Wonder.  See the logo on the stacks?  It’s huge!

DisneyWonder

Here are some shots of the town, and some other vessels we saw.  Also, our National Bird, doing what big birds do.

JuneauStreet

Big,bigger,biggest

BaldEagle-Juneau

The next day was a stop at Hoonah, and the weather was terrible, and the town was not too interesting, at least to me.  So I did what came naturally-took pictures from our balcony.

Channel-Hoonah

Beach-Hoonah

The following day was the one we had all eagerly anticipated-the trip to the Hubbard Glacier.  That’s what is in the new header, and here are a bunch of closeups of the glacier, the ice-flecked channel, and the mountainsides with many “mini-glaciers”.

ApproachtoHubbard

IceinChannel

Icebergs

Mini-glacier

GlaciersBigAndSmall

I thought the glaciers behind the main channel looked like big waterslides.

IceFortress
Hubbard Glacier, Alaska

WatersMeet

After a morning of glacier-viewing, we retreated to the nice, warm Palm Court Lounge, where lunch was served.

Warm-PalmCourt

Next stop, the town of Skagway.  The weather cooperated, and we had a nice stroll through the gold-rush town, with all its tourist-trap stores.  But it was fun anyway.  Herewith, pictures of the town and the channel where the cruise ships dock, and the wind blew very hard, late in the afternoon.

SkagwayDock-0801

KlondikeSign

Skagway

Mountains-Skagway

WindyChannel-Skagway

Next port of call was Sitka, a place we’d never been to.  All I knew was that there is a summer chamber music festival that has gone on for 30 years, run by string-players Paul and Linda Rosenthal.  It’s a pretty remote place for chamber music!  Just after being dropped downtown-5 miles from the cruise ship dock, we found the Lutheran Church.  They have a small pipe organ, built in Estonia in 1844.  Hubby got to play it, and he was thrilled!

HubbyPlaying Organ

Here are shots of the famous (three-times-rebuilt) St. Michael’s Russian Orthodox Church, and an interesting artifact that I couldn’t pass up.

StMichaels-Sitka

Bike-Salmon

Now, the harbor, and the working marina.

SitkaHarbor

SitkaMarina

The next stop was Ketchikan, where we’d been before.  We remembered from that trip that Ketchikan has a Starbucks, and no other stop had.  So we walked for nearly a mile, and found it!  Ahhh, the taste of your first Frappuccino in a week!  Unfortunately, it was pouring rain, so we didn’t spend too much time.  Here is what I saw.

Fishboat-Ketchikan

Ketchikan

The following day was again at sea, back south through the Inside Passage around Vancouver Island.  I spent a lot of that afternoon hanging off our balcony, taking pictures of the beautiful islands, sea, and sky.

InsidePassage1

InsidePassage2

InsidePassage3

This next shot is an intersection of two channels.  You can see the roiling waters, and the still picture can’t really convey the sense of the movement.  I got out the video camera, and got video, to be posted on my YouTube site.

ChannelsMerge

Thursday night we were honored to have dinner with our speaker, Michael Walsh.  He had lots of interesting Hollywood stories to tell, and we enjoyed the dinner very much.

We knew that the cruise was about to come to and end.  The next day was our last port call, Nanaimo, on the east coast of Vancouver Island.  It was a gorgeous day, and when we went out on our balcony, we found at the next dock, a ship being loaded with logs bound for China.

Logs2China

We spent the afternoon with our new Ricochet friend, Pete.  We went to a farmer’s market and to the marina for a stroll.

LadiesandVeggies

NanaimoMarina

Piper

You can see the two cannons on either side of that piper.  They were fired at noon, to great effect.

Ricochetti

Here we are with our new friend.  And here we are just before getting back on the ship for the last night’s festivities.

IMG_1356

Friday night was the Hillsdale Farewell Reception.  Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale gave a speech, and everyone mingled and drank champagne.  It had been an extraordinary trip, and we hope to be able to do it again in the future.

HillsdaleFarewell

TinyBubbles

And, here we are with Dr. Arnn.  He is just wonderful, and we are blessed to know him.

IMG_1365

All in all, a most successful cruise.

 

Photo Challenge: Cherry on Top

Burke Building

This is the old Burke Building, built in 1895 in downtown Seattle.  See the arched doorway in the center of the street level.  Then look straight up.  This old building had a real Cherry on Top.  This is what it looks like now, in the plaza of the newer Federal Building on the same site.

FromBurkeBldg-1895

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Ruffles and Flourishes-Architectural Detail in Downtown Seattle

This week’s Photo Challenge topic of Detail was perfect!  I had been planning to do a post on this topic for a while, and everything came together nicely.  This one also goes with last week’s Look Up theme.  So I packed up my camera and notebook, got in my car, and drove the 20 miles from my home to downtown Seattle.  This is what I found, by looking Up at the many older buildings downtown (and one new one).

Decatur Window detailDecaturBldg

These are the Decatur Building on Sixth Avenue.

These next pictures are the old Eagles Auditorium on Union Street.  Yes, the rock group The Eagles did play there in the 1970s.  It is now the home of the ACT Theater, and I’m really glad they kept the beautiful details of the outside of the building.

EaglesAudColumnEaglesAudWindowOldEaglesAud

The Cobb Building is one of the most famous Seattle landmarks.  When I was growing up, it was filled with medical and dental offices.  It now contains condominiums.

CobbBldgTopCobbBldgIndiansCobbBldg

Also famous as one of the best Art Deco buildings in Seattle is the old Northern Life Tower, now called the Seattle Tower.  It has many beautiful details.

SeatowerDetailSeaTowerDoor

OldNorthernLifeTower

Even the underside of the door canopy is decorated!  Inside, the elevator doors are also in the same motif.  Very beautiful.

The Exchange Building is from the same period as the Northern Life Tower, and has some of the same kind of exterior detail.

ExchangeWindowExchangeBldg

On First Avenue and Marion Street is the old Federal Building, and the original Seattle Post Office.  This complex dates from 1931, and is an excellent example of Art Deco.

OldFedOldFedBldgOldFedOfcBldg

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And One New Flourish.  1201 Fourth Avenue.

NewRuffles

Next time you are downtown in your city, look up.  You might notice things that are very beautiful.

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