A Not-so-modest Proposal to ameliorate some of the damage done to our National Forests by Smokey the Bear and his henchmen in the Environmental Movement

Ever since I can remember, Smokey the Bear has been telling us that only WE can prevent forest fires.

Smokey

So, who told Smokey that the Prime Directive was to Prevent Forest Fires?  Well, since the 1940s, the US Department of Agriculture used him to prevent Human-caused fires.  In later years, Environmental Wackos did their best to make sure that the National Forests remained in their pristine condition.  They did this by basically putting the forestry profession as much out of business as possible, to “preserve” the National Forests for whatever endangered species they could find.  Humans were considered destroyers of both forests and wildlife.  So national policy discouraged logging in national forests for many years.

The result of this enlightened policy was entire regions decimated by the logging companies put out of business.  On the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State, towns like Forks which had had thriving economies were deprived of their ability to support their people.  Unfortunately, when evergreen forests are not thinned, and fires are prevented, they build up heavy loads of underbrush, which in summer are fire hazards.  Another plague that has hit especially Western National Forests has been the pine bark beetle, which thrives on the wood of Ponderosa and other pine trees.  The dead trees killed by the beetle remain dried-out, and standing among the live trees, just waiting for that bolt of lightning.  Here is a picture of a forest in California.  The red trees were killed by the beetles.

dead trees

And here is the slope of Mount Rushmore.  See the dying trees?

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So I have come up with a proposal that should be a win-win-win situation.

First, the Federal Government should hold regional auctions, covering portions of the National Forests.  They would auction off, to the highest private-sector bidder, the rights to log their territory, ONLY removing dead or dying trees, and dry underbrush.

This type of auction would have many beneficial effects.  First, it would bring in money to the government, to help it manage the National Forests.  Second, it would improve the conditions in the forests, as dead and dying trees were removed and fire danger thus reduced, and the remaining trees would be healthier overall.  And Third, it would create jobs in the forestry industry, allowing professional logging companies to get back to their work, and reviving the economies of Western towns that used to depend on logging for their livelihoods.  Those loggers could sell their wood wherever they could find markets, and furniture-makers and others would have a large supply of wood with which to create products.  So everyone, except maybe the Environmental Wackos, would benefit.  Finally, society as a whole would benefit from the sight of forests that are greener and healthier.

Autumn Reflections

Autumn is my favorite season.  Hot weather doesn’t agree with my body very much, and I always welcome the onset of autumn.  The kids are back in school, the air is cool, and the sun still makes its appearance on most days.  Here are some reflections of autumn that I have captured, mostly around home in the Pacific Northwest.

FallColors
Fall Colors on the Wenatchee River, west of Leavenworth, WA
Symmetry-boats
Calm reflections in the water of the Inner Harbour, Victoria, BC

My husband and I got married in October, and this year will be our 15th anniversary.  We went to Victoria, BC on our honeymoon, and we return there often.  Mostly we stay at the hotel where we stayed then, the Inn at Laurel Point.  We love its location right on the Inner Harbour, and we try to get a room overlooking their peaceful garden and pond.

Laurel Point Garden Pond

The Butchart Gardens is a popular tourist destination, and we went there on our first trip.  We think it looks its very best in autumn.

FallButchart
Japanese Garden at Butchart Gardens, Victoria, BC Canada
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Walls of Garden

Autumn in Zion National Park in Utah.

Zion National Park
Cliff, Zion National Park

And at Cape May, New Jersey (3 days before Superstorm Sandy hit)…

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Birds, Cape May, NJ

LaConner Marina, along the Swinomish Slough.

Afloat at LaConner Marina

Happy Autumn to everyone!

 

Birds-like you see every day…but different

Wherever I go, I watch for birds.  Even in my back yard, I love watching our birds at the feeder.  Normally, juncos are ground-feeders, but ours just love hogging the feeder, watching for chickadees and nuthatches who might want to get in.

junco-sparrow

This is a junco and our song sparrow vying for the preferred station on the feeder, and there’s another junco perched on the side of the suet feeder on the right.

red-breasted nuthatch

Here’s one of our nuthatches (we have at least two pairs who frequent our feeder).  They usually go for a sunflower seed, then take it to the top of the fence to tap it out of the shell to eat.  They can go back and forth numerous times, rejecting the millet seeds and teasing out the sunflower seeds.

Chickadee at suet feeder

We get both Black-capped Chickadees and Chestnut-backed Chickadees at our suet feeder in the winter.

When we go on vacation, I especially love seeing familiar birds in new locales.  We met up with this fellow at Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah.

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I think he was actually posing for me!

Also in the Southwest, we went to the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, and I added two new birds to my life list.

Bird on Cactus, Desert Botanical Garden
Curve-billed Thrasher on cactus
Quail foraging under the agave
Gambel’s Quail foraging under the agave at Desert Botanical Garden

Our recent trip to Hawaii on the Crystal Symphony added new birds, but also new views of familiar birds.  From the deck of a cruise ship, you can get a view of a bird flying below you, like you rarely can on land.  Before we even left San Francisco, I got pictures of familiar birds from on the dock, and standing at the rail.  We have Western Grebes in western Washington, and here they are in San Francisco.

WesternGrebesSF

And from the Promenade Deck on the Symphony, I was able to get good pictures of the various kinds of gulls that were fishing in the harbor.  I think there was a big school of fish right there, since we saw pelicans, Western Gulls, California Gulls, and Herring Gulls wheeling in the air and crying while scooping up fish at the surface.

GullsFishingSFGulls-green water

Autumn and winter are now approaching, which will afford me great opportunities to see local birds, right in the back yard.  My camera will be ready!

Tranquil Thursday-Sea and Sky over the North Pacific

Tranquil Thursday-Sea and Sky over the North Pacific

it’s the end of the day on Thursday, and it’s time to get in a little relaxation.  Gaze at the photos of the North Pacific in July, from the deck of the Crystal Symphony.  Many faces of the North Pacific Ocean, and the infinite sky.

Sea-sky 7-17

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Sea-sky 7-18

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sea-sky 7-26

sea-sky 7-29

In the photo above, can you even see where the sea ands and the sky begins?  And have you ever seen water that blue?

Something else I found on my trip to Hawaii…Birds!

I am an amateur bird-watcher, and when I see a new one, I check it off on my “Life List”, which is in the back of my 1960s edition of Roger Tory Peterson’s Field Guide to Western Birds (which is now a collector’s item).  Fortunately, in this guide are two pages of pictures of Hawaiian birds, one of natives, and one of introduced species.  All but a few of the new birds I saw is on those two pages.  Here, first, are the new ones I saw.

Barred Dove

This is a Barred Dove, which we found in the center courtyard of the Ala Moana Shopping Center, at the Starbucks there.  We saw lots of these around all the islands we visited, and they formed small flocks.  I thought they were prettier than the common pigeons we see in most cities.

CommonMynah

This black bird is an Indian Mynah, and their screeches fill the air everywhere in Hawaii.  They fill the niche of the Brewer’s Blackbirds we see on the mainland.

2Mynahs

The one on the left is a juvenile bird.

Egrets

These are cattle egrets, and they were everywhere around Pearl Harbor.

Egret-Mexico

And this fine fellow is a Snowy Egret, and I actually saw him in Ensenada, Mexico.

Brazilian Cardinal

Here’s an introduced species, seen at Pearl Harbor.  He’s a Brazilian Cardinal, and was actually easy to identify by his red crest and black-and-white body.

Saffon Finches

This is a pair of Saffron Finches.  Aren’t they pretty, with their yellow bodies and orange heads?

As we headed home from Hawaii through the North Pacific, birds were pretty much absent.  However, as we approached Ensenada, Mexico, I was happy that I had my camera with me on my walk around the Promenade Deck in the early morning, because I was able to “capture” a sea bird that was new to me.

Masked Booby

This is a Masked Booby, and I was thrilled that I could get this good of a picture.

However, there was one new bird whose picture I took that I could not identify.  He was in the grass in the company of the saffron finches, and I have no idea what he was.  Maybe one of my loyal followers can identify this Hawaiian bird.

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I’m sure they’re some kind of finch, but nothing I found in my bird book looks like this, with the all-over gray body and red “mask”.

Bird-watching is a very rewarding pastime, and the fact that I got new ones for my life list in Hawaii will always bring a smile.

Last Half of the Journey-Hawaii Cruise Travelog-Leaving Hawaii for Mexico…And Home

Last Half of the Journey-Hawaii Cruise Travelog-Leaving Hawaii for Mexico…And Home

Wednesday, July 25 through Monday, July 30, we were again at sea, and you know what that means…  Lectures!  The weather wasn’t conducive to much deck-walking, but I did get a few ocean and cloud pictures.  This was the last picture of Hawaiian waters.

Out of Kona6PM

Sea-and-sky-July25

July 25 speakers were Roger Kimball on “Trump vs The Elites”; John Steele Gordon on “A Brief History of American Medical Insurance”; Dr. Arnn on the history of the Administrative State; and George Neumayr on the political papacy of Pope Francis.  The Pope has been the subject of lively discussions, both on the cruise and on Ricochet among the site’s many devoted Catholics, and Mr. Neumayr’s talk generated lots of questions.  In fact, the ship’s Irish-Catholic chaplain had some slightly-hostile remarks which Neumayr fended off masterfully.  We took home a signed copy of his book entitled The Political Pope, which is a must-read.

Thursday, July 26 saw a new roster of speakers.  Nick Lloyd discussed the part of World War I from 1915-17; Patrick Caddell discussed media and polls; and Walter Russell Mead spoke on “Britain, America, and the Making of the Modern World”.  I brought home Mead’s book God and Gold, and it is proving to be a very interesting treatment of the history of Western Civilization with an emphasis on the invaluable contributions of the English-speaking countries.

This is what the view was from the Promenade Deck that day.

Sea-and-skyJuly26

And this is what we saw from the Churrascaria restaurant that evening.

Sunset-July26

Friday, July 27, brought more captivating lectures.  Michael Ramirez gave a history of the editorial cartoon, with ample examples of his own work.  Victor Davis Hanson discussed the Battle of Midway, and John Steele Gordon spoke on the history and future of money (which everyone was very attentive to, for obvious reasons).  After lunch, Michael Walsh spoke on the decline of music in Western culture, a subject that interests me greatly.  I have never been very fond of recently-composed music, since it seems to me to be aimed at the composer rather than the listener, and if you can’t please the audience, your music might not get played or sung very much.

Here’s the view from our balcony on Friday.

ViewFromBalcony7-27

On the trip home, the sea was pretty rough, and we got excellent balance practice every time we walked anywhere.  I was lucky, and never completely lost my balance, even in the pitching, rolling shower!  Saturday’s lectures were by Walter Russell Mead on US foreign policy, George Neumayr on the “never-ending investigation”, and Nick Lloyd on the end of World War I.

RoughSeas7-28

On Sunday, July 29, we approached land again, toward Ensenada, Mexico.  I could tell that we were nearing land when the color of the water changed, the skies grew lighter, and the air was warmer.

Sunrise7-30

I couldn’t sleep well Saturday night, so I was up at dawn to capture this beautiful sunrise.

CalmWaters7*29

The water was very calm, and almost seemed to melt into the sky, making the horizon almost disappear.

Wake-7-29

My followers will know that I love watching the wake of a big ship, and I have pictures of the Washington State Ferries, as well as the cruise ships I have sailed on.  I just love the patterns the wake makes in the water.

Land-Island-Mexico7*29

This is an island off the west coast near Ensenada, called Todos Santos Island.

IslandMexico7-29

I had to zoom in to see it, but about 3/4 of the way down the slope to the right, there is a structure that I saw was a big cross, which is consistent with the name of the island.

PelicansandGulls7-29

We could tell there was a big school of fish out there, due to the presence of seagulls and pelicans having a fine time fishing for breakfast.

Pelican-Mexico

This guy came out to meet us.  The name on the boat was PilotoII, indicating that he was a Harbor Pilot, assigned to guide us into the crowded harbor at Ensenada.  See how his wake is twice as wide as he is.

PilotoII

Then, I saw something that reminded me of home in the Puget Sound.  There were a few big buoys out in the harbor, and this one was occupied.  By a local sea lion, a kind of seal.

RestingOnTheBuoy

In Seattle, big sea lions rest on the buoys, and use them as a spot to fish for passing salmon.  I’m betting this guy was fishing too, and he has a gull to keep him company (and compete for fish).

MexicanWaters

That’s our wake in the water of Ensenada.

HarbotToursEnsenada

We also saw numerous Mexican tour boats which go out of Ensenada, all filled with enthusiastic tourists.  When we landed and walked around, we saw people lined up for the next tour.

I saw this structure in the harbor, just outside the working waterfront, and wondered what it might be.  Followers, can you enlighten me perhaps?

Floating-what?

As we approached our berth at the cruise-ship terminal, we got to watch this container ship, the COSCO Indonesia, being loaded with containers.  COSCO is a big Chinese state-owned shipping company.  It was fun watching the orange crane picking up and placing containers precisely where they should go.

CoscoIndonesiaUnloading

Here are some more highlights of the Ensenada harbor.

HillsideHomesEnsenada

Homes on the hillside above the harbor.

BigFlagEnsenada

I think this is one of the biggest flags I’ve ever seen.  Those Mexicans are proud of their country!

Marina-Ensenada

Nice Marina they have there.  There’s another one on the other side of the harbor.

CarnivalInspiration

Our berth-mate that day was the much-larger Carnival Inspiration.

CruiseTerminalEnsenada

The cruise terminal at Ensenada is very colorful, and has a building with lots of shops where the locals sell their wares.

Fountain-Seagull

The fountain is a very convenient bird-bath, and this gull was taking his daily shower.  Ensenada, in Baja California, has a very dry climate with little rain, so you can understand how the gull takes advantage of what humans have provided.

Upon disembarking, we walked around the bay to a crowded, lively marina shopping area, and took in the sights and sounds of Ensenada.

Band-PlazaMarina

Restaurant-Ensenada

CantinaBand

My husband, who plays accordion, got a kick out of this little band.

All too soon, it was time for us to board the Crystal Symphony, for the journey back to San Francisco.  Monday, July 29, was a sea day, and we had lectures by Michael Walsh and Pat Caddell.  The final lecture of the cruise was supposed to be Dr. Arnn discussing Hillsdale’s Mission.  But it turned out that Dr. Arnn left the cruise at Ensenada, to answer the call of Betsy DeVos, the Education Secretary, to go to Washington DC to discuss education.  Since he was not there, the Hillsdale crew cooked up a big panel discussion with all the remaining speakers, and the audience asked lots of interesting questions.  The Hillsdale cruisers are well-educated bunch, and we all thoroughly enjoyed all the lectures and all the speakers.

FinalPanel7-30

Personnel, from left: Tim Caspar, Hillsdale Associate VP for External Affairs who moderated; John Steele Gordon, Michael Ramirez, Pat Caddell, Michael Walsh, Nick Lloyd, George Neumayr, Victor Davis Hanson, Roger Kimball, and Walter Russell Mead.

Monday, July 31, we arrived back in San Francisco.  We had packed the night before, and when it was time, we all filed into the Starlite Club ballroom to await our group being called.

WaitingToLeave7-31

When we disembarked, we boarded a bus for the ride to the airport.  We got checked in, and awaited our flight back to Seattle.  Once in the air, I pointed my camera out the window, and got some spectacular cloud pictures.  And mountains, too.

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Mountains7-31

The cruise had been wonderful, but we were glad to be home.  And the kitty was glad to have us back, too.

Next year’s Hillsdale cruise will be to the British Isles, to celebrate the conclusion of the project involving the complete Churchill biography and documents.  We don’t know yet if we will go, but we will have this year’s cruise to remember for a long time.

 

 

 

Vacation Travelogue-Last Hawaii Stop-Kailua-Kona

Vacation Travelogue-Last Hawaii Stop-Kailua-Kona

After the thrilling volcano-viewing session, a nice dinner, and a good night’s sleep, we arrived at our last Hawaii stop, the town of Kailua-Kona.  Again, the Crystal Symphony had to “anchor out” in the harbor, and we were ferried in on the ship’s tenders.  It was only a 15-minute ride, and we got a good view of the other vessels.  On these trips, passengers and speakers rode together and got a glimpse of famous people dressed-down.

VDHOnTender

Yep, that’s Victor Davis Hanson in shorts and lime-green t-shirt.

SymphonyAnchoredOut'

Seen from the dock on shore, there’s the Symphony and one of the other tenders, which shuttled back and forth all during the day.  Here’s what we encountered after getting off the tender.

OutriggerCanoes

Now that’s Hawaii!  Those outrigger canoes were available for rental right at the dock.  Also right at the dock were some very Hawaiian businesses.  I got the biggest kick out of this shop.  I wonder what distinguishes “gourmet” from “ordinary” Hawaiian Shave Ice?

ShaveIceSign

My husband just had to try real Kona Coffee, so we went into the shop next door.  Another sign that just caught my fancy.  We don’t have kids, but I wonder if parents would find this funny.  I sure did.

CoffeeSign

From the dock, we took a walk through town, just seeing the sights and peeking into the various shops.  We found a little outdoor mall, which had a very interesting fountain in the middle.  It featured some exotic plants, and some interesting animals too.

FountainPlants

Mosses

I thought those mosses were so beautiful, with the rivulets of water cascading down.

Greenery

Now, see that tree trunk?  I moved around to the left, and used the zoom setting on my camera, and what I saw was quite remarkable.

Animals

I spotted both the little green lizard on the left, and the big snail on the right very quickly.  Hubby had to be shown the snail!  I was fortunate to get them both in the picture before the lizard moved, and he was standing very still.

We headed down the street, and passed this landmark.

PalaceSignPalace

I don’t know, that doesn’t look like much of a palace to me, but it was in its day.

We (well, I anyway) did some shopping, and on our way back to the dock, we found a little beach, in back of a motel in town.  This beach had some beautiful volcanic rocks, and a nice view of the harbor and the incoming surf.  No surfers, however, since the beach was way too rocky!

Beach

BeachAndBoats

BlueWater-rocks

On a pretty gray day, that wave looked awfully blue!  And see the kite-surfer on the horizon?  We seemed to see them at every port we visited in Hawaii, though this one stayed pretty far from shore, for obvious reasons.  I did like the volcanic rocks, which showed the makeup of the terrain on this island.

VolcanicRocksRocksAndSurf

KonaShore

We walked as far as we could on the beach walk, then headed back toward the street.  I did enjoy viewing all the varieties of plant life in Hawaii, many of which were brightly-colored.  These flowers grew on the motel property.

Hibiscus

WhiteHibiscus

I thought this tree-trunk looked a bit like an elephant.  I wonder why?

BigTrunk

So we made our way back to the street to walk back to the dock.

PalmTrees

GnarlyTree

I really liked the twisted branches of this tree.  I zoomed in on it to capture the smaller branches.  Can you see the bird in this photo?  Even I had to look more than once to see what I had captured!  And I don’t know what kind of bird it was.

FindTheBird

We took the tender back to the ship, and while en route saw this.

Sub-Atlantis-Kona

That is a little half-submarine, which took tourists out to see what is beneath the waves.  We went back aboard the Symphony, and left harbor around 6:00PM.  From this shot from the ship’s deck, it looks like the trip home might be a bit choppy.

LeavingKailua-Kona