Calling-all-RushBabes

Defy Tyranny. Break the Lockdown.

Hillsdale College Resists Pressure by “Black Lives Matter” Supporters

Hillsdale College Resists Pressure by “Black Lives Matter” Supporters

And Good for Hillsdale!  Hillsdale College admitted black students and women from its founding in 1844.  This illustrates its genuine Virtue of action, as distinct from the virtue-signaling demonstrated by companies and colleges pandering to the segregationist Black Lives Matter movement.

In this article at the Washington Free Beacon Web site (a must-read for any conservative), the author describes how students and alumni of Hillsdale have tried to pressure the College to issue a statement backing the group.  Hillsdale’s response is exactly right.

Please support Hillsdale College in its mission of promoting Learning, Family, Faith, and Freedom.

There is no hope for Seattle. More confirmation, June 16.

The City of Seattle is lost.  The City is no longer controlled by its elected officials, no matter how Left and Socialist they are.  The City government, and many private businesses surrendered to Antifa and the Black Lives Matter terror groups [I define them both as terror groups due to their methods, including arson, looting, vandalism, and illegal “occupation” of public rights-of-way].  The Police Chief of Seattle negotiates with the so-called “protestors”, thus granting them status.  And no one thinks anything of it.

Here are some reasons why Seattle is lost.

Seattle City Council OKs ban of “crowd control weapons”.

Capitol Hill Trader Joe’s store closed indefinitely following Black Lives Matter protests.

Visitors go to the Capitol Hill Occupied Protest Zone

From Wobblies to CHAZ, Seattle has a long history of protests.

CHAZ changes its name to CHOP to better reflect demonstrations’ message.

Thousands participate in Seattle Children’s March.

[ED: New stories today, June 16. It gets worse]

Seattle reaches agreement with occupiers.   Agreement includes the Seattle Department of Transportation replacing wooden barriers with concrete ones!  Seattle Government Agency is helping the terrorists occupy City territory.  Seattle considers the “occupiers” to be the City’s equal.  This is frankly disgusting.  You don’t negotiate with terrorists, you  rout them.

Seattle business owner near occupied zone detains robbery suspect, calls police. Police do not respond.   Now we know who is more important in Seattle.  And it isn’t the law-abiding business-owning taxpayers of the City.

Seattle City Council mulls bills repealing loitering crimes for drug offenders, sex workers.  This speaks for itself.  With no police to enforce the law, we simply repeal the law.  Welcome to Lawless Seattle.

Are you ready for the “socially-distant” future?

Are you ready for the “socially-distant” future?

This afternoon, I was reading my Wall Street Journal from a few days ago (I still take the old-fashioned print edition, and I am always behind), and I noticed more than one article that, taken together, got me to thinking some very uncomfortable thoughts.

I have read more than one article describing the “new office”, brought about by the Wuhan Coronavirus.  Most big offices in large cities were shut down by government decree in March and April, resulting in thousands of workers being laid off, furloughed, or directed to work from home to avoid contagion.  With some offices now allowed to reopen, companies are having to totally rethink their office layouts, so their employees can be “kept safe”.  The bolded chapter heading is “Distancing and Cleanliness”.  In the office of the very near future (like tomorrow), “Among the first priorities is figuring out how to maintain social distancing in an office.”  Software applications will now govern where and how employees interact.  Meetings will be smaller and less frequent, and employee desks will be further apart [thus cutting down on employee interaction]; “density sensors” may prevent too many employees in any one room at a time; all surfaces will be obsessively cleaned all day every day.

In the new office building, elevators will not be allowed to hold more than two people, and all the buttons will either be gone or changed to some kind of “no-touch” technology. Many will still work from home, and their colleagues in the office will hold Zoom meetings when they need to be in a group discussion.  A researcher at the Interdisciplinary Center for Healthy Workplaces at UC Berkeley advises “bringing employees together virtually now to share ideas on how to re-establish social bonds while maintaining social distancing.”[italics mine]

Then, there’s the article on the New Hospital.  The ideas in that article are extremely depressing to me.  The title is “Rethinking the Hospital for the Next Pandemic”.  Here are some phrases from that article.  What does this make you think?

A future where such crises [the Wuhan Coronavirus Pandemic] may become a grim fact of life.

 

These changes promise to markedly reduce risk and disease spread-and change the way people experience care even in times when there is no crisis.

 

…it will also become less hands-on than people have come to expect.

 

…come up with ways to keep patients out of those [waiting]rooms.

 

…remotely triaging patients before they even arrive.

 

…an iPad rigged on a four legged robot called Spot allows staffers to see patients from a safe distance in the ER or a triage tent outside, via a video assessment and a thermal-imaging camera to measure breathing rate.

 

Keeping Doctors and Patients at a Distance.

 

To make it safer for patients and staff alike, some hospitals are trying to limit contact.

 

In intensive-care units, instead of placing IV poles and monitors next to the patient, they are now positioned outside the room so nurses can check patients’ status without unnecessary exposure for both…

 

For example, he says, newly-diagnosed heart-disease patients, who need frequent checkups and possibly adjustments to their medications, could use the [electronic] system to relay important data to their doctors remotely.

The above observations are scary enough in themselves, but then I was thinking about the “vulnerable elderly” who are confined to nursing homes, or live in various other congregate long-term-care environments like assisted-living communities.  In the Wuhan Coronavirus pandemic, thousands of such vulnerable elderly people died alone, in their rooms, forbidden to see family and friends in their final days.  For some reason, the idea of a video visit on an iPad sounds cold and unfriendly to me.

It is well-known that human beings are social animals.  Isolation is used as punishment in prisons and even by mothers with unruly children who send them to their rooms as a “time-out”.  It is also well-known that human babies need close contact with their mothers to thrive and grow.  Children neglected by their parents and not held or cuddled can waste away, or become depressed or anxious.

The idea of isolation being the theme of the “new office” or the “new hospital” is very unpleasant.  It is not a nice thought, that starting now, we need to be afraid of our coworkers, and even our doctors.  It is uncomfortable to have to go through life in fear of every other human being you encounter, but it appears that those designing physical spaces, and medical care facilities, will now be doing their best to minimize contact among all employees and clients.  It is not fun to think that your hairdresser, your manicurist, and your doctor, are now afraid of you.

I am in the age-group that is now defined as “vulnerable”, and it scares me shitless to think of what it will be like if I ever have to go to a hospital for any reason.  Will I be held at arms-length by everyone I encounter?  Will I be prevented from having any visitors, including my husband?  Will I be forced to suffer, and maybe even die, alone?  This is abhorrent to me, and I plan to do everything I can to avoid that kind of future.

I wonder how many others think this kind of future is a nightmare?  How many of you out there are horrified with the physical environment that will, by design, keep others away from you?  We humans require others around us, for celebrations, concerts, sports, and restaurant meals.  Will we all agree to give up things like handshakes when meeting a new colleague, or hugs when comforting a friend who has suffered a loss?  I hope and pray that my fellow people will not go happily into the “socially-distant” future without putting up a fight.

These are not protests and protesters anymore in Seattle

These are Armed Domestic Terrorists, allowed by the city government to control a portion of the city.  They set up barricades, stop residents and business owners from going by, and threaten them.

Antifa-CHAZ

Do these look like peaceful demonstrators to you?  The Seattle Police Department Third Precinct has been abandoned, turned over to the likes of these armed terrorists.

SPD3RDPrecinct

The Rule of Law has been overturned in Seattle, with the approval of those who are supposed to be protecting the citizens.  The Mayor, the City Council, and the Seattle Police Chief, Carmen Best, all bear responsibility for this.  It’s funny, actually, since the average Seattle resident is a supporter of “gun control”.  They approve guns for Antifa, and for the security details of their elected officials, but not for the citizens that need to defend their property from the terrorists above.

Seattle is in for a lot of trouble.  And they asked for it,

Leftists Eating Each Other in Seattle [Extensively edited with new information]

This Fox News Web Site story today is just priceless.  The Mayor, white, homosexual, female Jenny Durkan, has been “demanded” to resign by avowed Socialist City Council-creature Kshama Sawant.  Yeah, as if Durkan takes orders from the Clowncil!  Sawant let demonstrators into City Hall, because in her view it “belongs to the people”.

“Protesters” Storm City Hall!  Those same protesters took over the Seattle East Precinct, making a 6-block “police-free zone”.

seattle-protests-1-AP

And now this, from MyNorthwest.com.  It seems that the so-called “demonstrators” on Capitol Hill (above) are armed, and now establishing checkpoints around the neighborhood, and attempting to extract “protection money” from local businesses.  How is this helpful?  With no police, this is what you get.

Here are some quotes from another article on the KOMO Web site, about the “protester-occupied Autonomous Zone” near the Seattle Police East Precinct on Capitol Hill.

After Seattle police boarded up and abandoned the east precinct, a story started to spread that protesters with guns had broken in and were occupying the building. This is false.  [emphasis mine]

Now, just think about the bolded statement above.  The Seattle Police have abandoned their precinct station, and basically surrendered to the Occupying Force of Protesters.  What, exactly, does this say about the Police of the City of Seattle, whose job it is to protect the citizens of the city.  This is appalling!  In my opinion, this reflects the known fact that the city government of Seattle does not support its police force, and has not done for many years.  They are the descendants of 1960s radicals who think of police as “pigs”.

However, armed citizens are patrolling the streets around the police station. It’s also true that rifle-toting citizens have set up checkpoints and may be restricting who goes in and out.

Does this sound like a revolution to you?  An entire neighborhood of the city patrolled by armed “citizens” who probably do not live in that neighborhood.

And the truth actually gets even worse.

“We have heard anecdotally reports of citizens and businesses being asked to pay a fee to operate within this area,” Nollette said. “This is the crime of extortion.”

“The collective believes in the diversity of tactics,” said protest organizer Dae Shik Kim Hawkins, Jr. “I think a lot of different coalitions and efforts are trying to achieve a very similar goal.”

Police said they are reaching out to these leaders so they can move back into the east precinct without inciting more civil unrest.

What does this sound like to you?  To me, it sounds like, again, the Police have surrendered to the Protesters, and have to ask their permission to move back into their precinct house!  The Protesters’ Goal is a Police-free city.

 I have changed my mind about this being fun for us non-Seattleites to watch; it is now scary, and horrifying.  I feel sorry for all the business owners whose establishments were burned or looted during the so-called protests over the death of a career criminal in Minneapolis.  And I feel badly for all the citizens who are being prevented from returning to their homes, by armed thugs at checkpoints.

Hey, “protesters” and “demonstrators” in Seattle.   Be very careful what you wish for, you might just get it.  I wonder how criminal gangs and drug-pushers feel about Leftist wimps who pull the police from the streets in favor of social workers?  We may be about to find out.

What now for the performing arts?

What now for the performing arts?

Due to Government Edicts all over the United States and the entire world, performing arts organizations have essentially been prevented from staging their symphony concerts, big-band jazz concerts, chamber music performances, and choral concerts, due to fears of spreading the Wuhan Coronavirus.  They range from world-class orchestras like the Seattle Symphony, the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, to stage plays on Broadway, to the Seattle Chamber Music Festival, and Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra.  Smaller groups have smaller cash cushions to get them through half a season with no presentations.  Groups have had to cancel needed fund-raising events like dinners and auctions, further reducing their available funds.

Many orchestras, especially the large ones like New York, Chicago, and Philadelphia, have audiences that skew older.  But even places that cater to younger audiences, like nightclubs and rock concerts, have been closed down.  The venues themselves are in trouble, not having any ability to stage the events that keep them in business.  Will arts organizations like this be forced to deny tickets to older people, “for their own good”?

What will the future look like for these arts groups and venues, when the government holds their future in its hands?  Will a concert hall like the Kimmel Center Verizon Hall in Philadelphia, be able to stay in operation if its audiences are limited to 25% capacity?  Will the Philadelphia Orchestra be able to continue under those circumstances?  The Arts are a part of life that makes living worthwhile.  Millions of people all over the world spend time watching and listening to music of all kinds.  What happens when the “music stops”?

What will be the future of the Arts, if a vaccine against the Wuhan Coronavirus takes longer than anticipated to hit the market?  Will Governments insist that there be no concerts, or performances, or plays for audiences larger than say 50 people?  Will Arts organizations agree to commit suicide, because that is what they will be required to essentially do?

This spring and summer in Seattle, everything has been canceled.  We are very unhappy that the Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra, the Seattle Chamber Music Festival, the Northwest Chamber Chorus, and the Seattle Symphony, have all not been able to stage one concert.  We are very sad that we will not have the wonderful experience of sitting in Benaroya Recital Hall listening to our favorite musicians play their sublime chamber music.  They have even canceled the outdoor concert scheduled for August!  And the Leavenworth International Accordion Celebration was also canceled, preventing Hubby’s band from performing.

We are very unhappy and depressed about what is going on, but if we are feeling that way, just think of what the musicians and the Festivals are going through right now.  This is their livelihoods, and that hangs in the balance.  People who make their living playing music need an audience, and those audience members need that music.  We are not allowed to make our own decisions about whether to take the risk of being in the same room with the rest of the listeners and performers.  Government has deemed that we not be allowed to attend concerts, because we might be infected.

Funny, but you don’t see concerts being canceled during flu season from October to March, in case someone might catch the flu from the person next to them.  Flu kills thousands of people every year, but the world does not stop turning.  I wonder what the ongoing effects of the Wuhan Coronavirus will be on the performing arts, that add such love and excitement to life.  Will the organizations survive?

Please, spare me the sanctimony.

White self-abasement, begging the Racial Justice Warriors not to come after Them.

From the management at Best Buy:

We are, I believe, in one of the toughest times in our country’s history, as we continue to battle a deadly pandemic and the resulting economic havoc while, once again, coming face-to-face with the long-term effects of racial injustice. Watching tens of thousands take to the streets to speak out against fear and inhumanity is, on one hand, inspiring for the commitment it represents and, on the other, heartbreaking for its profound need.

But what’s next? What do we do to change the cycle in which black men or women, with tragic frequency, are harmed by those who are supposed to protect them? Or the gut-wrenching truth that to be a person of color in America is often to not feel fully safe, seen or heard?

For me, it starts with seeing the situation for what it is, acknowledging these experiences for what they are and, quite simply, apologizing for not doing enough. As important, it includes committing the company I lead down a path of systemic, permanent change in as many ways as we can find.

I don’t have the answers, but I am no longer OK with not asking the question: If everything were on the table, what could Best Buy do? With that in mind, I am appointing a diverse group (by demography and level in the company) to challenge one another and, ultimately, our senior leadership team and Board of Directors, with substantive, enduring ways we can address the inequities and injustices to which all of us bear witness every day.

In many ways, we have engaged in these issues for years. We have long been focused on the opportunity gap and its companion, the digital divide. More than a decade ago we began building a national network of what we call Teen Tech Centers, places where teens from disinvested communities are exposed to and trained on a range of technology that, we now know, can make a critical difference in helping them find success in post-secondary education or the job market.

We are looking to create more than 100 of these centers, open year-round and typically hosting hundreds of young people who begin in middle school and leave when they graduate high school. We do not do this alone, of course, as our employees, vendor partners and dozens of nonprofits are actively engaged in bringing this mission to life.

Additionally, we have brought our resources to bear on the issue of remote learning. In our home state of Minnesota, we helped found a public-private effort to provide computers and internet access to hundreds of thousands of youth from disinvested communities who have neither. Without this technology, learning from home, should it be necessary this fall and winter, would be impossible, widening both the digital divide and opportunity gap.

This effort is reflective of our broader view that we must continue to be an important player in the communities we are a part of, especially those hardest hit. This includes continuing to serve the neighborhoods in which our stores were damaged.

As for those who rely on us the most — our employees — we continue to focus on their safety. Just as we did in response to the pandemic, we closed some stores around the country when we felt the risk was too high. Some remain closed, and any affected employee will be paid for their time. As always, no one is compelled to come back to work if they feel uncomfortable.

From the Vanguard Group Web site:

When clients come to our website, they are generally looking for perspectives on markets, insights into investment strategies, or details about a specific fund. Today we would like to share something about the people you invest with. As a company, we are appalled by the killings of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd, and we are troubled by the systemic issues that led to their unjust deaths.

Our team of 18,000 people from all walks of life comes together to serve you, our clients, and to support the communities in which we work. Our employees—our crew—live by a mission that includes taking a stand for investors and treating them fairly. The recent tragedies remind us that this commitment must extend beyond the realm of investing to shape how we support our colleagues and clients.

We condemn racism, xenophobia, and prejudice of any kind, all of which run counter to Vanguard’s values. We stand united with the black community and lend our voice to the call for meaningful and systemic change.

We’re on our own journey. As an employer, we strive every day to make Vanguard a more diverse and inclusive company—a place where each individual can reach their full potential. While we are not yet where we want to be, our crew are leading the way with open conversations about race, religion, gender, and sexuality. We’re particularly grateful to our Crew Resource Groups, such as the Vanguard Black Professional Network, which have challenged us to do better and strengthened our sense of corporate community.

Our crew are passionate about improving the social disparities in our communities and give more than $10 million of their own money each year to drive change. Unfortunately, the recent social injustices underscore that there is so much more to be done. Vanguard will pledge an additional $5 million in immediate giving to support organizations committed to addressing injustice and racial disparities.

These actions are steps toward a future where our communities are safe and our crew have equal opportunities to excel and to do their best work on your behalf. We won’t settle for less and are ready to work hard to make that future a reality. On June 9, Vanguard’s U.S. offices will open for business 8 minutes and 46 seconds later than normal, as we observe a period of silence for George Floyd and reflect on what more we can do.

This makes me sick.  Neither of these entities has ANY history of racial discrimination in any way.

STOP THE WHITE GUILT.

 

Who is in charge of the Seattle Police Department, June 2020?

Seattle2020Riot

Yesterday, in the midst of the Riots (otherwise described as protests against the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis), that would have been Mayor Jenny Durkan and Police Chief Carmen Best.

Today, on the other hand, responsibility for the Seattle Police Department has been handed over to:  “SEATTLE POLICE-ACCOUNTABILITY GROUPS”.  In a story titled:

Mayor Durkan Announces Temporary Ban on the use of tear gas by SPD at demonstrations

The Mayor and the Police Chief have deferred to so-called Police Accountability Groups in their policy of banning, for at least 30 days, police deployment of tear gas to break up huge crowds of rioters in Seattle.  Hereafter, police policy will be made by groups not elected by the citizens of Seattle.  Now, the anarchist group known as “Antifa” has vowed to take their brand of rioting, violence, and destruction to Seattle neighborhoods not in the downtown core.  I am wondering tonight how the residents of Seattle are feeling about that.  Funny, but nowhere in the KOMO article are the “police accountability groups” named.

In another story, too, the Martin Luther King County Labor Council has informed the Seattle Police Officers Guild that it needs to“become and anti-racist organization”, or “get out”.

The violent inmates of the Insane Asylum of Seattle have been handed the running of that former city in the Pacific Northwest.  I feel sorry for the ordinary citizens of the city, who brought this upon themselves by electing their far-Left governments, over and over.

 

This is how Leftists Mourn George Floyd

Violent, armed looters overrun Santa Monica Music Center: ‘They took everything from us, and no one stopped them’

 

This was a community music school in Santa Monica, California.  Was.

This is how modern-day Leftists mourn a black man killed by a police officer in Minneapolis.  Wanton destruction, theft, and vandalism.

THIS. IS. WHO. THEY. ARE.

MusicCenterHavoc

Living Proof that America is NOT a Systemically Racist Country

screen_shot_2016-03-22_at_4.36.11_pm.jpg

Barack Hussein Obama was elected President of the United States. Twice.  By both black and white voters.

As for the so-called Black Lives Matter movement, may I recommend that you drop by Ricochet and read the excellent essay by member Derryck Green.  He nails it.

Unknown

Please tell me how looting and burning advances the cause of black people.

 

%d bloggers like this: