The Intelligence Operative’s Children

The Intelligence Operative’s Children

I am very fond of Daniel Silva’s thrillers, about his Hero, Israeli Intelligence Operative (and now head honcho), Gabriel Allon.  Gabriel has worked tirelessly for his country, eliminating terrorists of every stripe, all over the world.  His first wife, Leah, who for years has lived in a psychiatric hospital in Israel, was made insane by the terrorist bomb (see A Death in Vienna) that killed his son, Danny, was sane enough to grant him a divorce a few years ago.  Shortly thereafter, he was able to marry Chiara, his fellow intelligence operative.  They are now proud parents of twins, a boy and a girl (see Black Widow).

All through Silva’s novels, the reader is reminded how dangerous the profession of Intelligence Operative (spy) is.  A spy’s enemies are literally everywhere, following his or her every move, and plotting ways to put him or her out of action.  Gabriel Allon was pretty much a ghost for a long time, his movements fairly cleverly concealed by his home Office, and his attempts to stay out of the public eye.  His actions of terrorist elimination were observable.  Once he is exposed, and his picture is splashed all over the press, it becomes more difficult for him to work.

I have been giving a lot of thought lately to a spy’s children.  Once he is known, it becomes much more difficult for him to conceal his and his family’s whereabouts and actions.  In fact, if he and his wife choose to become parents, they are putting innocent people at risk. But having children is a primal human need, and it must be a very delicate decision to make, whether to have those children, ensuring your name and memories survive you, or to decline based on the danger to everyone involved.  The thing that makes a spy’s children a dangerous proposition is the fact that his enemies don’t have to kill him to put him out of action.  They can just go after his family.  Gabriel now doesn’t just have to worry about his terrorist enemies trying to find and kill him, and bomb or otherwise attack his country.  He must worry, 24/7, about the safety of his wife and children, who now are prime targets.

I learned, actually, from the movie The Godfather, how easy it is to drive your enemy insane.  Just go after what they love, and you don’t even have to get them (remember the scene with the horse’s head in the bed-gruesome).  Gabriel Allon is fortunate that his wife is also an intelligence operative, and can use her own considerable wiles to protect their children from harm.  But it must be very difficult to be in that situation, where you pretty much cannot ever relax, ever.  You must be vigilant and observant all the time to protect the children from all the bad people out there, just waiting to pounce.  They all now live in Israel, whose defense services are legendary.  But you and I have read the news stories of the continuous attacks on Israeli soldiers and civilians by the ubiquitous Arab terrorists, many of whom live in Israel.

So think about it.  If you were an intelligence operative, would you have children?  I think it’s a case of “choosing life”.  You would, because of God’s Commandment to Choose Life.  Life will always conquer Death.

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Illegal Immigration…Mexico Encourages it! Make this Handbook go Viral.

Illegal Immigration…Mexico Encourages it! Make this Handbook go Viral.

Thanks to my Ricochet friend “Wiley”, you can now access the Mexican Government’s Handbook for Illegal Immigrants to the United States from Mexico.  This handbook is published only in Spanish, and is available to any Mexican who thinks he can make a better living in the United States than he can in Mexico.  Just FYI, Mexico relies heavily on the remittances sent to family in Mexico from Illegal Immigrants to the USA.  My resourceful friend, “Wiley”, has translated this handbook for your edification.  Herewith is the “Guide for the Mexican Migrant”.  The original has graphics that did not copy, but the text below is engrossing in itself.  Please read, and send to as many of your “immigrant rights” friends as you can.  One more thing.  Mexico itself has very strict laws prohibiting illegal immigration into Mexico!  And their laws are strictly enforced!

Published by Mexico’s foreign ministry (apparently in 2005). The version displayed below was captured from the sre.gob.mx website. “SRE” stands for Secretaria de Relaciones Exteriores or the office of the Mexican Secretariat of Foreign Affairs which is the equivalent of the US Department of State. I can no longer find the guide on their website. The guide gives insight into the Mexican government’s attitude towards illegal immigration into the US. It begins with (page 1):

Dear fellow citizen:

This guide tries to provide you with some practical advice that may be useful to you in case you have made the difficult decision to seek new work opportunities outside of your own country. [emphasis added]
Then the guide proceeds to illustrate and advise on how to “cross the northern border without the necessary documentation” (page 1); safety measures for swimming the Rio Grande (pages 4-5); advice on choosing a smuggler (pages 8-11); how to deal with the US border patrol (pages 12-17); legal rights once in the US including “You are not obligated to disclose your immigration status when you are detained” (pages 18-23); how to avoid detection once in the US (pages 24-27); and a handy list of the Mexican consulates in U.S. Cities including their phone numbers (pages 29-30).

I have provided the entire guide with an English translation below each page. It is helpful if, as you read, you envision an equivalent document written by the Dept. of State, advising US citizens on illegal entry into Canada.

INTRODUCTION, PAGES 0 – 1

Dear fellow citizen:

This guide tries to provide you with some practical advice that may be useful to you in case you have made the difficult decision to seek new work opportunities outside of your own country.

The safe way to enter another country is by first obtaining your passport, which is issued by the Delegations of the Secretariat of Foreign Relations, and your visa, which you request at the Embassy or Consulate of the country to where you wish to travel.

However, we actually see many cases of Mexicans who try to cross the northern border without the necessary documentation, crossing high-risk zones that are very dangerous, especially in desert areas or rivers with strong and not always noticeable currents.

INTRODUCTION, PAGES 2 – 3

As you read this guide you can also learn some basic questions about legal consequences of your stay in the United States of America without appropriate immigration documents, as well as the rights you have in that country once you are there, independent of your immigration status.

Always keep in mind that there are mechanisms for you to enter the United States of America legally.

In any case, if you encounter problems or difficulties, remember that Mexico has 45 Consulates at its disposal in that country, whose contact information you also can find in this publication.

Identify your Consulate and go to it.

RISKS, PAGES 4 – 5

DANGERS OF CROSSING IN HIGH-RISK ZONES

Crossing the river can be very risky, especially if you cross alone and at night..

Thick clothing weighs you down when it’s wet and makes it hard to swim or float.

RISKS, PAGES 6 – 7

If you cross in the desert, try to travel when the heat is not so intense.

Highways and towns are very far apart, so that it could take you several days to find roads and you will not be able to carry food or water for that long. You could even get lost.

Salted water helps you retain body fluids. Although you get more thirsty, if you drink salted water the risk of dehydration is lessened.

Dehydration symptoms are:

? Little or no perspiration

? Dryness of eyes and mouth

? Headache

? Fatigue and exhaustion

? Difficulty in walking and reasoning

? Hallucinations and mirages

If you get lost follow utility poles, railroad tracks or furrows.

BE CAREFUL OF ALIEN SMUGGLERS, PAGES 8 – 09

BE CAREFUL OF “POLLEROS”, “COYOTES” OR “PATEROS” [Various names for alien smugglers)

They can deceive you by assuring you they’ll cross you [smuggle you across the border] at certain times over mountains or through deserts. This is not true! They can put your life in danger leading you through rivers, irrigation canals, desert areas, along railroad tracks or freeways. This has caused the death of hundreds of people.

If you decide to use the services of a “pollero”, “coyote” or “patero” to cross the border, consider the following precautions to take:

Don’t let him out of your sight; remember that he’s the only one that knows the terrain and therefore is the only one that can guide you safely.

Do not trust anyone who offers to cross you over to the “other side” and asks you to drive a vehicle or carry a package for him. Regularly those…

BE CAREFUL OF ALIEN SMUGGLERS, PAGES 10 – 11

…packages contain drugs or other prohibited substances. For that reason many people have ended up in jail.

If you transport other people you can be confused with an alien smuggler and be accused of alien smuggling yourself or even vehicle theft.

Don’t hand over your minor children to strangers that offer to cross them to the United States.

DO NOT USE FALSE DOCUMENTS, PAGES 12 – 13

DO NOT USE FALSE DOCUMENTS OR DOCUMENTS OF OTHER PEOPLE, NOR DECLARE A FALSE NATIONALITY

If you try to cross with documents that are false or that belong to someone else, keep the following in mind:

The use of documents that are false or that belong to someone else is a Federal crime in the United States, for which you can be criminally prosecuted and end up in jail; the same as if you give a false name or say you are a U.S. citizen when you are not.

Do not lie to U.S. border crossing or inspection booth agents.

IF YOU ARE DETAINED, PAGES 14 – 15

Do not resist arrest.

Do not assault or insult the officer.

Do not throw stones or other objects at the officers nor at the patrol cars, because this is considered a form of provocation.

If the officers feel they’ve been assaulted they will probably use force to detain you.

Raise your hands slowly for them to see you’re unarmed.

Do not carry or hold any objects that could be construed as weapons, such as: lanterns, screwdrivers, blades, knives or stones.

IF YOU ARE DETAINED, PAGE 16 / YOUR RIGHTS, PAGE 17

IF YOU ARE DETAINED

Don’t run or try to escape.

Don’t hide in dangerous places.

Don’t cross freeways.

It’s better for you to be detained for a few hours and be repatriated to Mexico than to get lost in the desert.

YOUR RIGHTS

IF YOU ARE ARRESTED, YOU HAVE RIGHTS!

Give your true name.

If you are a minor and are accompanied by an adult, tell the authorities so they do not separate you.

YOUR RIGHTS / YOUR RIGHTS, PAGES 18 – 19

Your rights are:

To know where you are.

To request to speak to the nearest Mexican Consulate representative in order to receive help.

To not make statements or sign documents, especially if they are in English, without the aid of a defense attorney or Mexican Government Consulate representative.

To receive medical attention if you are injured or in poor health.

To receive respectful treatment regardless of your immigration status.

To be transported safely.

To have water and food when you need it.

You are not obligated to disclose your immigration status when you are detained.

YOUR RIGHTS, PAGES 20 – 21

To not be hit or insulted.

To not be held incommunicado.

In case they take away your personal effects, request a voucher in order to claim them when you are released.

If there is any violation of these rights, it’s important for you to inform your attorney or Mexican Consulate representative that visits you or even the nearest Delegation of the Secretariat of Foreign Relations within Mexico.

If you wish more information and you live in Texas or in Ciudad AcuÒa, Coahuila, tune in to “The Powerful Station” at AM 1570.

IF YOU ARE ARRESTED / DETAINED, PAGES 22 – 23

IF YOU ARE ARRESTED / DETAINED

If you have already been sentenced for some crime or you are in jail facing criminal prosecution, you have the following rights:

To not be discriminated against by the police, the courts or prison authorities.

To receive visits from consular officials and family members.

To receive appropriate legal counsel without conditions or obstructions.

If you being criminally prosecuted and have not yet been sentenced, ask your attorney or consular representative what the “Plea Agreement” consists of.

Do not plead guilty without first consulting your attorney about the possibilities of winning your case if you go to trial.

It’s important they you know the laws of the American state where you live and work, since each state’s laws are different. Bear in mind the following information:

If you drink don’t drive, since if you do not have papers you can be detained and deported [a bit of INFOMUNDO editorializing here: no word about maiming or killing yourself or others as a drunk driver!].

If a legal resident is cited more than two times for drunk driving, he can be deported.

Do not drive without a driver’s license.

Observe traffic signs and signals and use your seatbelt.

Do not drive without auto insurance nor drive an unknown vehicle.

[THINGS TO] AVOID, PAGES 24 – 25

Do not pick up strangers.

If you commit some traffic violation and are detained by the police, place your hands on the steering wheel and do not get out of the car until the officer requests you to do so.

Avoid calling attention to yourself, at least while you are arranging your residence papers to live in the United States.

The best formula is not to alter your routine of going between work and home.

Avoid noisy parties because the neighbors can get upset and call the police, and you could be arrested.

Avoid fighting.

If you go to a bar or night club and a fight starts, leave immediately, since in the confusion you could be arrested even if you did not do anything wrong.

Avoid family or domestic violence. As in Mexico, it is a crime in the United States.

[THINGS TO] AVOID, PAGES 26 – 27

Domestic violence does not consist solely of hitting others but also can be threats, shouting or mistreatment.

If you are accused of domestic violence against your children, your mate or someone else who lives with toy, you could go to jail. In addition, Child Protective Services authorities could take away your children.

Do not carry firearms, bladed weapons or other dangerous objects.

Keep in mind that many Mexicans have died or are in prison because of these things.

If the police enter your house or apartment, do not resist, but ask to see a search warrant. It’s better to cooperate with them and ask to speak to the nearest Mexican Consulate.

CONSULATES, PAGES 28 – 29

The Secretariat of Foreign Relations has 45 consular representatives within the U.S and on its southern border, which are designed to help you. Remember: if you have been detained or are serving a sentence, you have the right to speak with the nearest Mexican Consulate. Always carry your “Guide to Consular Protection” with you at all times.

Get Near to the Consulate…

Embrace Mexico.

It’s your home, fellow countryman!

– Secretariat of Foreign Relations

– General Administration of Protection and Consular Matters.

CONSULATES OF MEXICO IN THE UNITED STATES, PAGE 30 (left side above)

List of U.S. Cities and phone numbers.

STATES – [MEXICAN] STATE GOVERNMENT OFFICES – DIRECTORY OF OFFICES GIVING ATTENTION TO MIGRANTS IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, PAGES 31 (right side previous page), 32-33, 34 (page below)

List of Mexican cities and phone numbers.

BOX ON LAST PAGE:

This consular protection guide is not promoting the crossing [of the border] of Mexicans without legal documentation required by the government of the United States; its objective is to make known the risks implied and to inform about the rights of migrants regardless of their legal residence.

Notes

Images: https://albertozambrano.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/guc3ada-del-inmigrante-ilegal-mexicano.pdf

English translation: http://www.theamericanresistance.com/ref/brochure_translated_guia_del_migrante_mexico.html

Original URLs for document:

http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page1.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page2.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page3.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page4.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page5.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page6.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page7.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page8.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page9.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page10.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page11.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page12.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page13.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page14.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page15.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page16.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page17.htm
http://www.sre.gob.mx/tramites/consulares/guiamigrante/page18.htm
BookmarkPublished in Immigration

The View from Above the Clouds

I think it’s quite remarkable that, in a fairly short time, Americans invented the airplane, and took it from a simple, light craft made of wood and fabric to a huge metal cylinder that can carry up to 500 people at a time and fly halfway around the world in comfort.  Here are some photos I’ve taken from the window of an airplane, at 30,000 feet.

Above the clouds
Above the Clouds at 30,000 feet
Grand Canyon
Grand Canyon from the air

Clouds-From Above

dscn0614

img_0058

Passion Personified

That’s what we heard last night at the Seattle Chamber Music Festival’s second Winter Interlude concert at the Nordstrom Recital Hall at Benaroya Hall in Seattle.  They had programmed one of my very favorite pieces of chamber music, Gabriel Faure’s Piano Quartet in C Minor.  From the very first note of the first movement, this piece is filled with passion and fire.  We were carried away by last night’s performers: James Ehnes, Violin; Cynthia Phelps, Viola; Yegor Dyatchkov, Cello; and Anton Nel, Piano.  They put their heart and soul into this performance, and the audience was very enthusiastic.  I don’t have video of last night’s performance, but I have the next best thing.  At the Bridgehampton Chamber Music Festival (on Long Island, New York) in 2014, a group of excellent musicians played this piece, and they were just wonderful.  Also, funny thing, three of those musicians also come to Seattle for the Seattle Chamber Music Summer Festival in July!  Give a listen to this performance, with Gilles Vonsattel, Piano, Jennifer Frautschi, Violin, Cynthia Phelps, Viola, and Clive Greensmith, Cello.  This is Passion Personified.

Images…What’s in a Name?

What do these names have in common?

They are both occupations.  Way back in the medieval period in England, people didn’t have “family” names, since there were few enough people around.  They were often known by what they did in the community.  John, the miller, who owned the flour mill by the river and accepted everyone’s grain to grind into flour.  If there were ten people named John in the village, they were distinguished by their occupations so people didn’t get them mixed up.  So you might have John the miller, and John the butcher.  Eventually, when there were enough people around, those occupations became their last names, and their children had two names, a first name and a last name.

For a while now, I have, just for fun, been keeping a list of last names that are occupations.  I’d love it if my followers could add names that I’ve missed.   Here is what I have so far:

Smith (as in blacksmith), or Schmidt the German variation

Miller

Butcher

Baker

Chandler

Glover

Barker

Fletcher (makes arrows)

Driver

Shepherd (or Shepard)

Cooper (makes barrels)

Goldschmidt (goldsmith)

Farmer

Mercer (makes thread)

Fuller (processes cloth)

Pope

King

Fisher

Marshall, or Marshal

Mason (the Masonic order was made up of the specialized stonemasons who built early cathedrals)

Draper

Proctor

Carter

Cook

Collier (miner)

Miner

Porter

Glaser (makes windows)

Tanner

Palmer

Cantor

Singer

Provost

Taylor, or Tailor

Knight

Framer

Warden

Chancellor

Sailor, or Saylor

Weaver

Squire

Forrester

Carver

Steward, or Stewart

Planter

Harvester

Page

Carpenter

Hunter

Clark, or Clerk

Abbott

Potter

Archer

Buyer

Postman

Chamberlain

Falconer

Reeve

Roper

Shoemaker

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/names/