Weekly Photo Challenge : Transition..Building..to Ruin..to Building

In the town of Bury St. Edmunds in England, the Abbey buildings have been crumbling for centuries.  From the original stone buildings, ruins.  Local residents pulled stones from the monastery ruins.  To build new dwellings.  Modern residence, built right into the ruins of the 11th Century Abbey.  How did the monastery become a ruin?  From 1536 to 1541, King Henry VIII dissolved all the monasteries and religious houses in Britain (remember the story of all his wives?), and confiscated all their wealth, which was prodigious, approaching that of the English Crown itself.  Henry’s minions traveled all over Britain, literally destroying the monasteries, and seizing anything they could carry, defacing what they couldn’t.  This was the beginning of the Church of England (Anglican).

House, built into the ruins of the abbey at Bury St. Edmunds, Ely
House, built into the ruins of the abbey at Bury St. Edmunds, Ely

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Properly Grateful…Joy of Giving

Properly Grateful…Joy of Giving

I like to think that I count my blessings every day, not just on Thanksgiving Day.  This year, I’ve had numerous occasions to reflect on the manifest blessings in my life, and my country.  I was fortunate to be born in the United States of America, which has, since its founding in the 18th Century, been a beacon of light, hope, and goodness in the world.  Up until the founding of this great country, the lot of the vast majority of human beings on Planet Earth has been squalor, poverty, disease, backbreaking work, and often early death.  Families had to produce many children in order for a few to survive birth and childhood.  Few were educated at all, and even fewer attained a high level of education.  Farmers destroyed huge forests to clear fields for planting, and those fields sometimes lost their fertility quickly, necessitating more forest destruction.   Plagues regularly decimated entire populations, and no one knew why or how to stop them.

How different is our world today!  How many people now consider it a right, to grow up healthy and happy, graduate from college, and pursue a lucrative career doing whatever makes them happy.  Our Founders bequeathed to us a Nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that All Men are Created Equal (hat tip, Abraham Lincoln).  Contrary to sometimes popular belief, Americans are the most generous, most virtuous, and happiest people on Earth.  The USA has been the greatest force for Good ever imagined, and millions of people in many countries have US generosity and help to thank for their position today (we virtually rebuilt Germany and Japan after World War II, and they are some of our greatest allies today).  When a natural disaster occurs anywhere on Earth, everyone looks to the United States first to jump in and make things right.   Minority groups such as my people the Jews, and black people, have found their lives immeasurably improved here in the United States, where we can go to school, live well, and earn a very good living just about anywhere.  Did you ever stop to think about why so many people from all over the world are clamoring to get into the United States?  As much as others may denigrate the USA, they still view living here as the best place to live!

I am properly grateful to God for allowing me to have been born in the USA, lived in a beautiful area for most of my life (the Pacific Northwest), and having health, earned wealth, and a family (though no children).  I am married to a wonderful man who has a great job, and is an excellent provider.  I myself have a pretty good job, at a company that makes products that improve peoples’ lives every day.  We both derive great joy from being able to play music, which enriches our lives and others’.  I own my house free and clear, both of our cars are paid off, and we are able to put away money for the future, while being able to buy just about anything we need today.  We have many friends, especially our musician friends, and our Ricochet online (and offline) family.

One of the benefits of being fairly well-off is the ability to give some money away.  I find that it is delightful to be able to donate to causes that we believe in.  Just last week, I was thinking of how much I am going to enjoy writing a “Christmas present” check at the end of the year to Hillsdale College.  It’s actually fun, deciding whether to donate to the Music department, the College Library, or the History department.  This year, I gave donations to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, and the American Friends of Yad Vashem (the Holocaust memorial museum in Israel).  Yes, the Joy of Giving is real.  And I find that the more I give, the happier it makes me.

So this Thanksgiving, I am thankful for everything I have, and the people I love, and our great country, which is the Greatest Country on God’s Green Earth.  And for everything my fellow humans have done to make this world a better place to live for everyone.

Le Jour de Gloire est Arrive!

Le Jour de Gloire est Arrive!

This past week, Hubby and I were fortunate enough to attend the World Men’s Squash Championships in Bellevue, Washington.  He went all week, and I attended the quarter-finals Friday, semi-finals Saturday, and exciting Final match on Sunday.  There were players from all over the world.  South Africa, Egypt, USA, Canada, Finland, Pakistan, England, France, and Australia were some of the nations represented.  All the matches were demonstrations of awesome talent, in a sport that is not very well-known.

We were on the edge of our seats on Sunday, when Gregory Gaultier of
France beat Omar Mosaad of Egypt in straight sets.  Normally, squash spectators are pretty quiet, riveted by the demonstrations of strength, stamina, and skill of two players smacking the small white ball around the glass court.  But individuals would call out their favorite player’s name, urging them on.  The audience erupted in loud shouts when Gaultier put away the last shot giving him the World Championship.  Vive la France!!

 

Photo Essay: University of Cambridge, Summer 1991

I admit it.  I am a total Anglophile.  I’m a sucker for a British accent, and since a trip around Britain in 1984, I fell in love with the city of Cambridge.  In the summer of 1991, I was fortunate enough to attend a three-week program put on by UCLA in Cambridge.  Attendees could take any of 8 different courses, from Country Houses, to Literature, to Medieval English Society, for UCLA credit or not.  So in January, I signed up to take Medieval English Society, not for credit since I already had a Master’s degree and just wanted to learn.

A few weeks in advance, I received a big packet of information about the course, the college, and a big reading list for my class.  The information said that you could write a paper if you wanted, and the professor sent a list of possible paper topics.  If you have been reading my blog at all, you are aware that I wrote a paper on medieval music, and it is posted below.  I went out and bought the recommended books for my class, which included a book on peasant life, and the memoirs of a monk named Jocelyn de Brakelond (which was fascinating, and proof that human nature never changes).  Needless to say, I had sufficient reading material for the eight-hour flight!

I got off the plane at Heathrow Airport, and caught a bus to Cambridge. I arrived in the afternoon, and hauled my luggage up to the gate of Trinity Hall College (not the same as Trinity College, next door).

Trinity Lane, narrow!
Trinity Lane, narrow!
Rear entrance, Trinity Hall.
Rear entrance, Trinity Hall.

The nice man at the entrance gate gave me my welcome packet, a map, and directions to my room.  I had, all to myself, a beautiful room in a building that had been around since the 16th Century.

Dorm stairs, well-worn
Dorm stairs, well-worn

I wondered how many students had trodden these well-worn stairs.

Since I had some time before the first formal function, I got out my camera and took a walk around the grounds of Trinity Hall.  The college was started in the 1500’s to train Canon Lawyers, and traces are all over the college.  The Tower, pictured here, has the white crescent coat of arms of the College.

Tower over main building, Trinity Hall College
Tower over main building, Trinity Hall College

The evening brought introductions, and a tour of the College.  This is one of my most favorite places, the Dining Hall.

Dining Room at Trinity Hall College, where we stayed.
Dining Room at Trinity Hall College, where we stayed.

Meals there were fun.  The room was so beautiful, and the food wasn’t bad either, though they did find dozens of ways to describe various shapes of roasted potatoes!  We almost felt like royalty at meals, since there was waitstaff  at every meal, made up of students earning tuition money.  They were delightful. Oh yeah, and the College has its own bar!  A bunch of us would meet there each evening before dinner, and we were able to carry our drinks with us to finish with our meal (this was when I discovered Guinness Stout, and I had my half-pint daily.  At least once during the three weeks, each attendee got to sit at the High Table for dinner, and speak to the after-dinner speakers we had three times a week.  I was seated next to the gentleman who was the Cambridge City Librarian, who told me that he had never traveled anywhere outside Cambridge.  He said, “Why should I travel, when Cambridge itself has so much?”  Indeed!

Window at Trinity Hall. Emblems are various groups of Canon Law students through the years.
Window at Trinity Hall. Emblems are various groups of Canon Law students through the years.

The window above was directly across the central courtyard from my dorm room, always a beautiful sight.

Here are my classmates, admiring a beautiful painting in the Trinity Hall Chapel.

Painting in the Trinity Hall Chapel
Painting in the Trinity Hall Chapel

The first class day was taken up with a walking tour of the town.  The City of Cambridge, where the Colleges are, is basically owned by the University, so its buildings may not be changed without College permissions.  Many of the old college buildings have been lovingly kept up and restored, and I have to say they are all just gorgeous.  We here in the USA don’t have anything to compare with these Cambridge College buildings.

Gate , Clock Tower, Trinity College
Gate , Clock Tower, Trinity College

Trinity College is right next door to Trinity Hall.  If you look carefully, you can see the mention of Edward III, who was the patron of Trinity College.

Entrance Gate, St. John's College
Entrance Gate, St. John’s College

St. John’s College is right down the street.  I just love the ornate stonework over the gate.  Now, at the back of St. John’s College, you see this.

Replica of Bridge of Sighs-Venice-Back of St. John's College, Cambridge
Replica of Bridge of Sighs-Venice-Back of St. John’s College, Cambridge
This is the door to Peterhouse College, Cambridge. It's the oldest College, started by the Bishop of Ely in 1284.
This is the door to Peterhouse College, Cambridge. It’s the oldest College, started by the Bishop of Ely in 1284.

Many of the Colleges back right up to the River Cam.  I found the river as it meandered through the city very peaceful and relaxing to watch.

A peaceful River Cam bridge, behind Trinity Hall.
A peaceful River Cam bridge, behind Trinity Hall.

This is the view of the river from the back lawn at Trinity Hall.  These were on the river, next door at Trinity College.  They can be rented.

Punts on the Cam, rentals from Trinity College
Punts on the Cam, rentals from Trinity College

Here’s a picture of me, standing inside a doorway in the College, original to the earliest days of Trinity Hall.  People were much shorter then than they are now!

Myself, in 14th Century doorway, Trinity Hall, Cambridge-I'm 5'6" tall
Myself, in 14th Century doorway, Trinity Hall, Cambridge-I’m 5’6″ tall
A punter on the River Cam, which forms the back boundary of Trinity Hall.
A punter on the River Cam, which forms the back boundary of Trinity Hall.

When I had free time, I would go walking through the town.  I never tired of the beautiful old buildings, which just seemed to ooze history.

Round Church, Cambridge, dating from 11th Century
Round Church, Cambridge, dating from 11th Century
Cambridge Corn Exchange, dating from 16th Century
Cambridge Corn Exchange, dating from 16th Century

On a lighter note, I found this poster just the day before we left for home.  They are one of my VERY favorite bands, and I was sad not to be able to attend their concert.

Poster, seen on downtown building in Cambridge, Summer 1991
Poster, seen on downtown building in Cambridge, Summer 1991

Our Professor for the Medieval English Society class was a teacher at Gonville & Caius College, whose specialty was the agricultural economy of the medieval period.  One day, he took us to see his College Library.  This is the part of the College.

Gonville & Caius College (pronounced "keys")
Gonville & Caius College (pronounced “keys”)

Needed a good cleaning!

Tower, Gonville & Caius College
Tower, Gonville & Caius College

The College Library had a number of ancient books, many under glass. I enjoyed seeing real, honest-to-goodness History!  I went to the open shelves, and pulled out a book at random.  Here’s what I found.

Title page of a book found in the Library at Gonville & Caius College. Yes, the publication date is in the 1600s!
Title page of a book found in the Library at Gonville & Caius College. Yes, the publication date is in the 1600s!

Edward III was the King who founded Trinity College!  The book was a bit difficult to read, given the old-style spelling, but I was just bowled over at getting to see the original source material.  I still retain a dream of actually going to Cambridge and studying history someday.

One of our early field trips was to Clare Castle, a ruined castle from the early medieval period.  The Professor told us it was an early example of “motte and bailey” architecture.  Motte being what we call a moat, and the bailey was a courtyard.

Dr. Mark Bailey, at Clare Castle, showing Motte and Bailey architecture
Dr. Mark Bailey, at Clare Castle, showing Motte and Bailey architecture
Closeup of a wall at Clare Castle-random stones in cement.
Closeup of a wall at Clare Castle-random stones in cement.

Later that day, we visited the beautiful old town of Blytheborough, which had a nicely-preserved church.

Ceiling Blytheborough Church
Ceiling Blytheborough Church
Ceiling detail, Blytheborough, beautiful angels
Ceiling detail, Blytheborough, beautiful angels
Pew carving, Blytheborough Church-man holding coat of arms-family pew
Pew carving, Blytheborough Church-man holding coat of arms-family pew
"Avarice", pew carving, Blytheborough Church
“Avarice”, pew carving, Blytheborough Church

These church pews are 800 years old!

Agriculture, pew carving, Blytheborough Church
Agriculture, pew carving, Blytheborough Church

We also visited two old wool towns, which had been the centers of the wool trade in the medieval period.  My favorite travel book about Britain, “The Intelligent Traveller’s Guide to Historic Britain” (Philip A. Crowl, 1983), has this to say about the town of Lavenham:

“The ancient wool town retains the most authentic medieval townscape in Britain.”

Building in Lavenham, wool town in Suffolk
Building in Lavenham, wool town in Suffolk
High Street, Lavenham. A wool town.
High Street, Lavenham. A wool town.

The town has a nice church, too.

Church, Lavenham
Church, Lavenham
Church, Lavenham
Church, Lavenham

Next, we visited the town of Long Melford, which is known for its medieval church (funny, we did see a lot of churches!).  Most of these old churches are still in daily use in their towns.

Long Melford Church
Long Melford Church
Inside Long Melford Church, beautiful well-preserved wood ceiling.
Inside Long Melford Church, beautiful well-preserved wood ceiling.
Church windows, Long Melford
Church windows, Long Melford

And then there was Castle-Castle-Country house day.  Castle Rising first.

Castle Rising
Castle Rising
Castle Rising. First intimation of "pointed arch".
Castle Rising. First intimation of “pointed arch”.

Look closely at the lower left wall in this picture. Then…

Castle Rising wall. Note the overlapping barrel arches-they make a pointed arch.
Castle Rising wall. Note the overlapping barrel arches-they make a pointed arch.

Overlap two identical things (the barrel vaults), and you get something entirely different.  The use later of the pointed arch marked the transition from medieval design to Gothic with its pointed arches.  Castle Rising was the place where King Edward III exiled his mother, Queen Isabella, after the execution of her paramour Mortimer.

And going inside, we found:

Students for Scale, Castle Rising
Students for Scale, Castle Rising
Castle Rising, "defense window". Archers shot from here.
Castle Rising, “defense window”. Archers shot from here.
Hearth, Castle Rising
Hearth, Castle Rising

Next stop, Castle Acre Priory.  This was a Cluniac monastery, dating from the Norman period, after 1066.

Ruins, Castle Acre
Ruins, Castle Acre
Gatehouse, Castle Acre
Gatehouse, Castle Acre

Last stop was Oxburgh Hall, a well-maintained country house, built by Sir Edmund Bedingfield in the 1480s, and added to and changed over the years.

Terra cotta screen, Oxburgh Hall Chapel
Terra cotta screen, Oxburgh Hall Chapel
Formal Garden, Oxburgh Hall
Formal Garden, Oxburgh Hall
Formal Garden, Oxburgh Hall, UK
Formal Garden, Oxburgh Hall, UK
Tomb of Mary Tudor, moved to Oxburgh Hall following the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII
Tomb of Mary Tudor, moved to Oxburgh Hall following the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII

On one interesting day, we went to the Norfolk seashore, to the towns of Orford and Dunwich.  At Dunwich, the North Sea has worn away the coastline considerably, uncovering the medieval church graveyard, and some of the bones of its “residents”.  This map shows how the sea is still encroaching on the town.

DunwichMap

Here is what I saw when I got down on my stomach and took a picture of the embankment.

Looking over cliffside in Dunwich, human bones from graves being exposed by the sea
Looking over cliffside in Dunwich, human bones from graves being exposed by the sea

Located near Dunwich are the ruins of the Greyfriars Abbey.  The round (barrel)-arched windows mark it as dating from around the Norman Conquest.

Greyfriars Abbey ruin, Dunwich, on the East Coast of Britain
Greyfriars Abbey ruin, Dunwich, on the East Coast of Britain

Next, it was on down the road to the town of Orford, also on the coast, and a beautiful…wait for it…Church!  The surrounding area was very picturesque.  I just love rural Britain, and its green fields, demarcated by stone walls or hedges.  It’s not very efficient farming, but it’s simply beautiful and relaxing.

Town of Orford
Town of Orford
Orford Castle
Orford Castle

The Castle was built by King Henry II in 1165, and it has 18 sides.  The flag on the top is the British National Trust flag, indicating that it is a significant heritage site.

Orford Church, Suffolk
Orford Church, Suffolk

Here are some things we saw inside the church.

Brass representation of a priest, Orford Church
Brass representation of a priest, Orford Church
Baptismal font, Orford Church
Baptismal font, Orford Church

The last out-of-town field trip we took was to the town of Ely, which has a famous Cathedral, and the Abbey (monastery) of Bury St. Edmunds.  The town is lovely in itself, with homes much like those we saw in Lavenham and Long Melford.

House, town of Ely-Cathedral in the background
House, town of Ely-Cathedral in the background
Ely Cathedral and Tower
Ely Cathedral and Tower
Tower, Ely Cathedral
Tower, Ely Cathedral
The Abbott's Door, Ely
The Abbott’s Door, Ely

And inside the Cathedral:

Knight's sarcophagus, Ely Cathedral
Knight’s sarcophagus, Ely Cathedral
Stained glass windows, Ely Cathedral
Stained glass windows, Ely Cathedral

As I mentioned above, our reading included the memoirs of the monk Jocelyn de Brakelond.  One of the abbots of the monastery of Bury St. Edmunds was Abbot Samson.  And in the graveyard on the monastery grounds, what did we find, but:

Headstone of Abbot Samson, who was Jocelyn de Brakelond's Superior in 1110 AD
Headstone of Abbot Samson, who was Jocelyn de Brakelond’s Superior in 1110 AD

The grounds of the ruined Abbey are very interesting.  The first sight as you approach the monastery are “modern” houses built right into the side of the ruined Abbey.  Remarkable!

House, built into the ruins of the abbey at Bury St. Edmunds, Ely
House, built into the ruins of the abbey at Bury St. Edmunds, Ely
Abbey Church ruins, Bury St. Edmunds.  Person for scale.
Abbey Church ruins, Bury St. Edmunds. Person for scale.
Abbey wall ruins, Bury St. Edmunds
Abbey wall ruins, Bury St. Edmunds
Abbey ruins, Bury St. Edmunds
Abbey ruins, Bury St. Edmunds

It’s an unusual feeling, standing in the middle of these impressive ruins, wondering what it was like when the buildings were intact.  Even today, you can get a good feeling for how massive they were-the monks must have felt the majesty of peoples’ monuments to their God and Church.

On the last day of class, we had a busy day. In the morning, the class members who had written papers presented them to the class.  I gave a sort of lecture-demonstration about medieval music, playing some of it on the local “boom-box”-remember, this was 1991 and the CD hadn’t been invented yet!  I was gratified that my classmates, and the professor enjoyed it.

This is what another class member did for the entire three weeks.  She would disappear for a couple hours in the middle of every day, never telling anyone where she was going and what she was doing.  Well, this is what:

One student's brass rubbing of a knight, took her 2 weeks to complete
One student’s brass rubbing of a knight, took her 2 weeks to complete

Doesn’t Dr. Bailey look sort of medieval in the way he’s holding the brass rubbing?  She had to get special permission from the church to pull back their carpet and do that rubbing.  That knight looks like he’s taller than she is!  People in the medieval period were much shorter than we are today, due to their poor diets and bad or nonexistent sanitation.

After the class was done, the whole group went punting on the River Cam, passing under the “Cam Bridge” that gave the city its name.

Two bridges over the River Cam, Cambridge (seen from a punt)
Two bridges over the River Cam, Cambridge (seen from a punt)
Swans on the River Cam in downtown Cambridge
Swans on the River Cam in downtown Cambridge

We had lunch at a nice restaurant in town.  It had been a magical three weeks, and I will always remember all the places we visited, and the fantastic view we got of how people lived 900 years ago.  Dr. Bailey wrote a book from his thesis, on the agricultural economy in the medieval period, and I bought a copy to read on the flight home.  I found it fascinating, and he was convincing in his theory that, contrary to prior belief, the farmers in East Anglia in the middle ages made quite a good living from their fertile land, given what tools and crops they had to work with.

I will always look back fondly on that trip.  I think Cambridge is one of the most beautiful cities in the world.  Go there some time, and see if you don’t agree.

Some Thoughts on Paris, Friday the Thirteenth

The massacre of over a hundred innocent French and other citizens was horrific, and expected.  The enemy of Western Civilization has been invited in their thousands to Western Europe for decades.  Islam, and Islamists will forever be the enemy of Western Civilization, until they are rooted out and destroyed.  Chance of that happening any time soon?  Less than zero.

And that entity called the US president issues an inane statement about the perpetrators being “brought to justice”.  No, stupid, it isn’t LAW ENFORCEMENT, it is WAR.

Not ONE additional Muslim should be allowed into the USA, for any reason.  Not one more “Syrian Refugee” should be resettled anywhere in Western Europe or America.  The Swedes have already lost their country, and the Germans are about to lose theirs.  A friend on Ricochet yesterday put it this way:

If you knew that 15% of donuts were poison, and you didn’t know which ones they were, would you allow any donuts in your house? <hat tip: Kozak>

Weekly Photo Challenge: Ornate

This is the sanctuary at St. Joseph’s Polish Catholic Church in Camden, New Jersey, during their 120th Anniversary celebration in 2012.  The priest is Polish, and there is a Polish-language Mass daily.  My husband grew up not far from here, and went to this church, and graduated from the parochial high school here (now defunct).  Pretty ornate.

St. Joseph Polish Catholic Church, Camden, NJ
St. Joseph Polish Catholic Church, Camden, NJ

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