Lens-Artists Challenge #100-The long and winding road.

When I see a road, I usually wonder where it leads.  On our travels in the Pacific Northwest, Hubby and I pass many freeway turnoffs with roads down which we have never traveled.  On the way to Mount Vernon, there is a freeway exit marked “Starbird Road”, and I have always been intrigued by the name.  We took the exit once, and it basically led nowhere.  All that was distinctive about it was the name.  Oh, well..

This road is in Eastern Washington, on the banks of the Columbia River.  Winding?  Certainly! And fun to drive, too.

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Winding Road-Eastern Washington State

I have always loved the “shrub-steppe” terrain in East-Central Washington. even when the hills are brown, they are beautiful to me, and the roads are laid out to follow the “lay” of the land, not just up and over.

Closer to home, right across the street from the biggest factory building in the world, is the Narbeck Wetland park.  Trails through the park wind among marshes and a tiny island.  There are sights to see in any season (just wear your boots in the fall and winter when the paths can get muddy).  I especially like the boardwalk.

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Roads are not always on land.  Off the coast of Washington State are the Marine Highways of the Gulf Islands of British Columbia.  The BC Ferries ply the “sea lanes”, connecting passengers with the various islands.  When we drive up to Victoria, BC, we love to take the big car ferries. The picture below was taken from the deck of a similar ferry.  The captains toot their horns when passing each other.

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BC Ferry, making its way through the Gulf Islands

There are big islands, like Salt Spring Island, and Vancouver Island (where Victoria is), and there are many tinier islands, some uninhabited, and some even privately-owned.

The Olympic Peninsula of Washington is one of the loveliest places in the state.  Many years ago, I had a boyfriend who lived in Port Angeles, so I went there (by car, and Washington State Ferry) often.  We would often go to the Dungeness Spit National Wildlife Refuge.  We know where this path leads…

Path to the Spit

The path down to the Spit (down a steep path from the wooded bluffs above) is lined with tall evergreen trees, Douglas Fir, Hemlock, and Spruce.  The Spit is five miles long, and at its far end is a lighthouse.  You can walk the entire length, which is much more difficult than it looks, since it’s all on sand.  When you reach the end, you know you’ve been getting your exercise!  Itself, it is a long, crooked road.

Dungeness Spit

[Author’s note: this post will contain no social commentary (seen elsewhere on this blog) nor virtue signaling]  Just the link to Tina’s original post.

 

 

This is Perfect. WA Senator proposes bill in Legislature to give Seattle what it asks for.

This is Perfect. WA Senator proposes bill in Legislature to give Seattle what it asks for.

If you follow the Northwest news at all, you will be familiar with the story of the environmentalists behind the drive to remove dams on the Snake River, to improve habitat for endangered salmon.  Never mind that removal of those dams would also result in the loss of many megawatts of clean, carbon-free energy production for Eastern Washington, and add thousands of trucks and rail cars to carry all the cargo that was previously carried on the river.  Local agricultural and utility interests in Eastern Washington have spoken with alarm about this proposal.  Some economists have also come out against the proposal, demonstrating that dam removal would have negative consequences for the entire region, even absent the enormous costs for removing the dams.

So, now, a State Senator has proposed a bill in the Washington Legislature in Olympia, to essentially give the citizens of Seattle (who are so numerous, and so Leftist, that they essentially run the State) the kind of project that they are asking for the citizens of the other half of the state to accept.  Senate Bill 6380 would launch a study of breaching the Ballard Locks and  removing the Seattle City Light Dams, to restore Seattle waterways to their pristine condition.  It would also restore Lake Washington to its original condition, and remove Ravenna Creek from its sewer pipe back to the surface.

This is the Gorge Dam, one of those Seattle City Light-run dams that brings electricity to the Social Justice Warriors of Seattle.

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The story above describes how the proposal would let the Skagit River run free as it did in the early twentieth century.  This story just made me smile, and I am interested in hearing how the Seattle contingent in the State Legislature responds to it.  Tit-for-tat; you want to take Eastern Washington back to the 19th Century, maybe you should contemplate Western Washington being returned to the 19th Century.

Oh, and the Senator who proposed this bill is a Republican from Ferndale, a town in Western Washington just south of the Canadian border.  Thanks, Senator Ericksen!

Photo Challenge…….Corner

This structure is in a pretty desolate corner of the world, on the bluff overlooking the Columbia River in north central Washington State.  It also has a multitude of corners, angles, and intersections.  You wouldn’t want to get caught by the sharp tip of one of those blades!  Stationary, it almost looks like a piece of art.  It was stopped the day we drove past it.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/corner/